Heritage kick for Tarwyn Park

Freedom of information heritage documents give boost to save Tarwyn Park from coal mine


News
Former owner Stuart Andrews reluctantly sold "Tarwyn Park" to KEPCO. A heritage report builds a big case to preserve the property's links to farming and horse breeding.

Former owner Stuart Andrews reluctantly sold "Tarwyn Park" to KEPCO. A heritage report builds a big case to preserve the property's links to farming and horse breeding.

Aa

Peter Andrews' famous sequential farm receives heritage boost in new government documents

Aa

As the release of a planning assessment over the proposed KEPCO coal mine at and near “Tarwyn Park” at Bylong draws near, the cultural values of the property have been bolstered by a heritage report.

Moves are afoot to see if the former horse stud, which is home to the burial place of dual Melbourne Cup winner Rain Lover, should be placed on the State Heritage Register.

The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage advised the Heritage Council that “Tarwyn Park” “may be of state significance for its roles in the 1823 settlement of the Central West, the development of the thoroughbred racehorse industry in Australia, and in the development of Natural Sequence Farming.”

OEH say that the Planning Assessment Commission can protect Tarwyn's heritage values by imposing certain conditions on KEPCO's development.

The report, obtained under Freedom of Information request by Lock the Gate Alliance says “Tarwyn Park”  “demonstrates continuous pastoralism for approximately 192 years, and thoroughbred horse breeding that was continuous for approximately 150 years”.

Lock the Gate understands that the Heritage Minister has urged the Planning Minister to ensure that a comprehensive study of heritage is conducted as part of KEPCO’s Bylong Coal Project assessment.

Lock the Gate’s Nic Clyde said the Minster should direct the PAC to “carefully weigh a brand coal mine approval against the growing and compelling case for heritage listing”.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by