Feedback trial numbers soar

Feedlot Trial numbers soar

Beef
Beef Spectacular Feedback Trial analyst, Jeff House, Forbes, with Teys Australia Jindalee Feedlot manager Shane Bullock, Stockinbingal.

Beef Spectacular Feedback Trial analyst, Jeff House, Forbes, with Teys Australia Jindalee Feedlot manager Shane Bullock, Stockinbingal.

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Beef cattle producers have chased processor feedback in strong numbers this year with 475 head entered for the 2018 Beef Spectacular Feedback Trial.

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AS the beef market continues its run at historically strong levels, beef producers are more determined than ever to improve their product, both at on farm and what they send to market.

This drive to lift the standard can be seen through the ever growing numbers put forward by producers each year for the annual Beef Spectacular Feedback Trial.

The induction of the 475 steers a week ago kicked off the eighth year of the event, now a regular feature on beef producer calendars, says coordinator Brett Tindal, Wagga Wagga.

The trial is conducted at Teys Australia’s Jindalee feedlot, and to date has attracted a total of 3000 head.

Mr Tindal said it was aimed at educating beef producers to hit specifications, fill out paperwork correctly, understanding cattle types, right through to analysing the extensive data they received.

Of the 475 head entered this year, they represented 23 different breeds or crosses from 53 vendors from across NSW and Victoria, and included 19 new participants. 

Of the 95 teams, there were 47 purebred and 48 crossbred or composite teams, which Mr Tindal said would provide some great feedback to analyse across the trial.

Trial analyst, Jeff House, Jeff House Livestock, Forbes, said despite the cattle going onto feed a few weeks earlier this year, the induction live weights averaged 410 kilograms, up 10kg on last year. 

“The cattle ranged in weight from 302kg to 494kg with 95 per cent of the animals falling in the ideal range of 320kg to 460kg live weight, while the fat depths were likewise on target ranging from two to 13 millimetres at the P8 (rump) site, with 95pc of the cattle again falling within the optimum fat depth of 3mm to 10mm,” he said. 

“On a slightly negative note, it was disappointing to see some producers still placing NLIS tags in the wrong ear and a number of PIC (property identification code) issues that did not match their previous movements on the NLIS database, which sees them lose lifetime traceability.”

Mr Tindal said the cattle were now settling into their 112-day regime, with a field day to be held on November 22, before being processed mid December. A presentation dinner will be held on Friday, February 2.

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