Boorowa river frontage for existing farming operation

Boorowa river opportunity


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"Tara" a grazing property well suited as an “add-on” to an existing grazing or mixed farming operation has become available in the Boorowa district, owing to its owner’s shift of focus, Peter Austin writes.

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A grazing property well suited as an “add-on” to an existing grazing or mixed farming operation has become available in the Boorowa district, owing to its owner’s shift of focus.

“Tara” is the 528 hectare (1305 acre) property of Anthony De Silva, who bought it in 1994 and is selling now to release funds needed for a free-range egg project he is developing on other local properties.

Since embarking on his egg-producing venture last year, Mr De Silva has partially destocked “Tara” with the result it is now in excellent shape and carrying a big body of feed.

This is the package now being marketed by CBRE’s Col Medway and Richie Inglis for private sale with a price tag of $2.25 million (equating to $4261/ha or $1724/ac).

Permanent water is a key feature of “Tara”, which is situated on the Kenyu Road, 17 kilometres north of Boorowa, where it fronts the Boorowa River for 900 metres as its eastern border.

The property also has a 1km frontage to the Goba Creek (which joins the Boorowa River on “Tara”, while further stock water is provided by 13 dams. Average rainfall is just over 600mm.

Geologically, the land occupied by “Tara” is believed to have once formed the crater of a volcano, with the result that much of the soil is of basalt or granite origin, interspersed with sedimentary types.

The country rises from the river through arable slopes to grazing hills, most of it having an easterly aspect. About 120ha of the total area is considered arable, although not yet under cultivation.

Pastures are mostly a productive mix of native perennials and introduced grasses and clovers, plus 75ha of established phalaris. 

The property was topdressed annually until 2012 although not since then, and there is ample scope to lift production through further pasture establishment, fertilising and supplementary cropping.

Estimated carrying capacity at present is around 3900 DSE and historically the property has typically carried 1250 Merino breeding ewes and replacements, and 100 cows.

About 250 ewes are normally mated to Poll Dorsets for prime lamb production, with the lambs being sold into trade or store markets depending on the season.

Merino lambs are dropped in September and sold off-shears as heavy lambs or hoggets.

Cows are calved in September with the calves usually turned off as weaners.

An aspect of “Tara” likely to appeal to local buyers is the fact it has not been over-capitalised.

Working improvements are modest yet adequate, and as the owner lives elsewhere, no costly homestead is inflating the price.

Working structures include a three-stand electric shearing shed with steel, bugle-design sheep yards, steel cattle yards with crush and loading ramp, machinery and hay sheds and silos.

The existing accommodation is a four-bedroom quarters block of clad construction.

It is in need of renovation, but the property offers many excellent home sites for an intending owner/occupier.

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