Cash in goats - if you can catch them

Cash in goats - if you can catch them


Neill Leigo, Allundy Station, White Cliffs, who has installed almost 100km of hinged-joint fencing to manage goats.

Neill Leigo, Allundy Station, White Cliffs, who has installed almost 100km of hinged-joint fencing to manage goats.

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ONCE the scourge of the Western Division, goats are now providing a valuable source of cashflow.

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ONLY 20 years ago Neill Leigo was shooting the goats that were draining precious water supplies on his White Cliffs property Allundy Station.

Now goats are a significant part of his business.

The Leigos are currently installing the final 10-kilometre stretch of hinged-joint fencing, which will mean almost all of the 100km of internal fencing on the property is now suitable to manage goats.

After finishing the internal fencing, Mr Leigo plans to upgrade the final section of boundary fencing.

“When we started fencing for goats, we didn’t have any intention of doing what we ended up doing,” he said.

That first paddock was followed by a 4040ha paddock, which was initially fenced to manage the goats to reduce woody weeds.

Mr Leigo said the main thing he had discovered during the past two decades of fencing for goats was ‘think big’.

“One thing I say to people who ask me for information about going into goats is don’t make the mistake of fencing too small an area to start with,” he said.

“The country suffers because they haven’t realised they’re going to run as many as they do end up running.

“It doesn’t take long for your numbers to grow.”

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