Temperament is a must

Temperament is a must at "Havilah East"


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Sarah and Jamie Inglis only work their very quiet Angus cattle on horseback and with a very reliable Border Collie at "Havilah East", Mudgee.

Sarah and Jamie Inglis only work their very quiet Angus cattle on horseback and with a very reliable Border Collie at "Havilah East", Mudgee.

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Quiet temperament is a must within the "Havilah East" Angus herd at Mudgee.

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DOCILITY may evolve through bloodlines, however good handling also plays a vital role in the temperament of animals.

Jamie and Sarah Inglis are sticklers for quiet temperament and will only work their Angus cattle on horseback with the use of their Border Collies.

According to Mr Inglis the right dogs and horses are of utmost importance and best ingredients for quiet cattle as exemplified within their herd of 100 breeders at “Havilah East”, Mudgee.

“We are very big on temperament and always work our cattle with dogs,” he said.

“All our weaners are broken into dogs so that when we muster we make sure our cattle walk to the yards.

“I would never go and yard cattle without being on a horse,” he said.

“Without a doubt, the right dogs quieten cattle however, they must be good steady dogs and well controlled.”

Mr Inglis is a member of the Inglis family’s livestock and bloodstock business first working with his father, Dick Inglis, in the Homebush and Camden cattle sales branch and now managing the company’s rural property division.

They moved to Mrs Inglis’ Mudgee district roots, a 566 hectare offshoot of the original White family’s Havilah run on the Lue road some 10 years ago.

Up until six years ago the Inglis’ were trading in steers however, they began to get more serious with their cattle operation and started buying Angus females to begin their own commercial herd.

“We put together a few heifers and cows mostly from the Scone and Mudgee Angus feature sales and are also breeding a few ourselves.”

Their first bulls came from Sandy Yeates’ Patawalla stud, Mudgee, and since that operation closed the Inglis’ looked next door to purchase from Mrs White’s cousin and neighbour, Nigel White’s Coffin Creek stud.

It was Havilah East heifers sired by Coffin Creek bulls which took out the Mudgee District Angus Breeders sale champion pen at Mudgee saleyards in May.

These were a pen of 14 in-calf heifers rising two years purchased for $1760 a head by Bruce Lewis, “Rob Roy”, Gulgong.

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