Quality is the main focus for branded beef

Quality is the main focus for branded beef


Beef
Aa

Having a high quality, consistent supply of beef keeps customers coming back.

Aa
Mountain View Black Angus, sold through Fords Butchery, Tamworth, is dry-aged for four to 12 weeks, depending on the cut.

Mountain View Black Angus, sold through Fords Butchery, Tamworth, is dry-aged for four to 12 weeks, depending on the cut.

HAVING a high quality, consistent supply of beef keeps customers coming back, according to Mountain View Black Angus and Fords Butchery owner Paul Avery.

Since finishing cattle on his own property, Mr Avery has been able to ensure a high standard of beef through his butcher shop and to regular clients, including local restaurants and pubs.

“The beef each week is exactly the same – there’s no variation,” he said.

The cattle get the same feed and are processed at similar weights, ranging from 250 to 290 kilograms (carcase weight).

“We give them the opportunity to get to the right weights, but most of the cattle we buy don’t have any trouble because they’re already good quality cattle and Angus cattle have that good finishing ability,” Mr Avery said.

Mr Avery kills a few head each week, with the cattle processed at Eversons at Frederickton. He further develops meat flavour through dry-ageing his beef.

“We generally hang our hindquarters for four weeks before we bone them out,” he said.

“We bone the rumps out and the scotch fillets then we vacuum pack them and give them another three or four weeks before we slice them.

“The dry-ageing contributes to the flavour and tenderness of the meat.”

Rib sets and T-bones are hung for a further four weeks before slicing.

“They’re generally dry-aged for eight weeks, so they’re full of flavour when they’re sold to the customer,” Mr Avery said.

Two local pubs – Joe Maguires and the Tudor Hotel – use Mountain View Black Angus T-bones, while the short rib is a feature on the menu of Tamworth’s newest restaurant, Hopscotch, and the Quality Hotel Powerhouse uses the 12-week dry-aged rump and loin.

Mr Avery said his customers were those who liked knowing where their food came from.

“We’ve got a lot of foodie-type people who we deal with, people who make their meals an event and really appreciate good beef.

“More people are also starting to understand what dry-aged means and appreciate the extra flavour.”

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by