Fertility key at Coonamble

Fertility key at Coonamble


Beef
Terry and Robyn Hanigan, "Hollywood", Coonamble, have been producing Angus cattle for more than 40 years as they suit their country and are considered fertile, marketable cattle.

Terry and Robyn Hanigan, "Hollywood", Coonamble, have been producing Angus cattle for more than 40 years as they suit their country and are considered fertile, marketable cattle.

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After more than 40 years in Angus cattle industry, Terry and Robyn Hanigan, "Hollywood", Coonamble, aren’t looking to change their production any time soon.

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AFTER more than 40 years in Angus cattle industry, Terry and Robyn Hanigan, "Hollywood", Coonamble, aren’t looking to change their production any time soon.

Originally, the Hanigan’s ran Hereford and Angus breeders, but about 30 years ago Mr Hanigan said the marketability and popularity of the Angus breed urged him to turn to a straight Angus production.

Since then, Mr Hanigan said he’s been producing maternal, hardy, fertile cattle that suit his country.

The Hanigans run a self-replacing herd and haven’t bought on any cattle other than bulls in the last 30 years.

When looking to select females for his herd, Mr Hangian said he’d look for an animal with a feminine structure, with good feet and fertility.

They also have to have a very good temperament, as that’s something Mr Hanigan wants to see improved within the breed.

With bulls, Mr Hanigan said he wouldn’t look at anything that wasn’t “super docile.”

Bulls also have to have good growth as well as being soft doing with a good structure.

Feet are a crucial part of Mr Hanigan’s selection criteria with bulls as he wants them to be extremely mobile.

When marketing his cattle, Mr Hanigan said he would almost always go to the feedlot market for his steers because the job has been so good over the last few years.

The steers are grown out to between 450 to 520 kilograms, usually when they reach about 15 months of age and are then sold to the feedlot.

Often, Mr Hanigan has been able to find Wagyu breeders or restockers who have wanted to purchase his excess females although, he has also sold them through the feedlot market as well.  

The Hanigans join their heifers with the bulls on July 20 and put the cows in about 10 days later.

Heifers are yarded with bulls for two months, and cows have three months of joining. Mr Hanigan said he joins the heifers for a shorter amount of time so the younger females have more time to get back into condition.

Calves are on the ground during May, which Mr Hanigan said allows them to take good advantage of the forage oat crop he usually sows.

Anything Mr Hanigan tries to get to finish weights are put on the oats, to ensure they’re fattened and sold before the property experiences a dry pinch after Spring.

Mr Hanigan said he would usually sell about 30 to 40 commercial bulls a year, which consist of the best of his male calves.

Again, Mr Hanigan said he would look for well grown, well structured calves to keep on as bulls.

Mr Hanigan sells his bulls to commercial producers privately, on farm. 

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