The rules on roundabouts | Video

The rules on roundabouts in Victoria | Video


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CIRCLE WORK: Roundabout laws apply equally to all road users in almost all circumstances. Picture: NONI HYETT

CIRCLE WORK: Roundabout laws apply equally to all road users in almost all circumstances. Picture: NONI HYETT

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When you should indicate, what lane you should be in and what you can do on a bike.

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Related:​ Road rules Q&A | Video

HOW do you navigate a roundabout correctly and avoid driving other road users around the bend?

A common mistaken belief is that drivers must give way to anyone approaching from the right when entering a roundabout.

But the law states drivers must give way to any vehicle already on the roundabout, although Sergeant Geoff Annand from Bendigo Highway Patrol said it once was correct to give way to the right.​

Road users must also give way to any tram entering or approaching a roundabout.

Sergeant Annand said there were no hard and fast rules around when to indicate intention to turn when approaching a roundabout, only that drivers should do so with enough time to give sufficient warning to other road users.

People going straight through a roundabout do not need to indicate until they exit, when they should briefly indicate left where possible, especially at larger roundabouts.

Drivers turning right should also briefly indicate left as they exit when they can.

If there is more than one lane approaching a roundabout, drivers must stick to the left lane when turning left and the right when turning right.

Those going straight ahead can use any lane, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise.

Roundabouts can become more complicated when there are more than four exits.

Sergeant Annand said motorists and other road users should take extra care when using such roundabouts, and anticipate that drivers might not be indicating correctly or in the way they would expect.

He said it was especially important that road users signalled their intentions at such roundabouts, although exactly what exits would warrant indication and when was mostly a matter of common sense.

He advised that when planning to take the second exit at such roundabouts, drivers should not indicate until they passed the first exit, even if it lay to their left.

This would ensure those entering from the left would not mistakenly think they were turning immediately and enter ahead of them.

The same rules apply to any road user, including cyclists; however, cyclists and horse riders can turn right from the left lane.

But in this case, they must give way to any other vehicles that are exiting before they make their exit.

SHARING THE ROAD: Roundabouts like this, where bike lanes merge into the regular lane, mean cyclists cannot be overtaken until they have left the roundabout. Picture: NONI HYETT

SHARING THE ROAD: Roundabouts like this, where bike lanes merge into the regular lane, mean cyclists cannot be overtaken until they have left the roundabout. Picture: NONI HYETT

New markings on roundabouts require cyclists to merge from bike lanes into a shared lane.

In this case, vehicles cannot overtake bikes until they have safely left the roundabout.

Locations of such roundabouts in Bendigo include the intersection of Williamson and Mollison streets, and Edwards and St Aidans roads.

The story The rules on roundabouts | Video first appeared on Bendigo Advertiser.

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