Canyonleigh weaners find strong market

Angus cattle are in demand


Local Business Feature
Robert Hall, Canyonleigh, joins around 1300 Angus females on six properties he manages. Photo by Emily Hall Photography.

Robert Hall, Canyonleigh, joins around 1300 Angus females on six properties he manages. Photo by Emily Hall Photography.

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Farm manager Robert Hall says there is always a demand for Angus cattle in saleyards.

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SALEYARDS just love Angus cattle.

And this is why Robert Hall is confident in the future of the breed, and that Angus offspring will always find a market.

Mr Hall manages six properties in the Canyonleigh region  of the Southern Highlands. 

He joins around 1300 Angus females on the 4580 hectares, which is owned by Filetron Ptd Ltd.

He also runs around 1000 fine wool Merinos, which are joined with composite rams.

Mr Hall has a lifelong interest in working with cattle, having also worked for studs and on cattle stations in the Northern Territory and Queensland.

It seems his passion for Angus cattle is also hereditary, with his 15-year-old twin daughters Katelyn and Emily beginning their own Angus stud, KEM Angus.

Mr Hall said his aim at the moment was to increase stocking rates since another property was bought towards the end of last year.

Bull are sourced from a number of studs, including Gilmandyke stud, Orange, and Mundoo stud, Glencoe.

Mr Hall uses Gilmandyke bulls to join his heifers.

“They are just a good style of cattle,” he said.

“They have good rib and rump, and have good calving ease for heifers.”

Breeders are joined in November for a spring calving.

Currently Mr Hall retains all heifers in order to build up numbers.

Meanwhile, steers are often sold at weaner sales around May.

Mr Hall said he aims to sell his steers on AuctionsPlus.

“You’ve got more control that way,” he said.

“It’s just the end of the line in the saleyards.”

Mr Hall also makes pasture and sorghum silage to feed stock, as well as planting oats and wheat forage crops for the winter.

Mr Hall said it made sense to breed Angus cattle.

“They are just good cattle,” he said.

“They get the premium at all the sales, and the feedlots love them.

“There are a lot of good breeds out there, and some really good cattle. But when the saleyards are telling you they are selling five to 10 cents better than others, you really can’t argue with that.”

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