How the sheep industry has risen from the ashes

How the sheep industry rose from the ashes


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Roger Fletcher explains how the Australian sheep industry pulled itself from the ashes to becoming a big player in Australian agriculture.

Roger Fletcher explains how the Australian sheep industry pulled itself from the ashes to becoming a big player in Australian agriculture.

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Many factors have contributed to returning the Australian sheep industry to a prosperous and vital sector of the nation's economy. Roger Fletcher explains how.

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Many factors have contributed to returning the Australian sheep industry to a prosperous and vital sector of the nation's economy. But from the ashes of the 1991 collapse has come a faster, efficient and more profitable industry with a positive future outlook.

Reaching out to the world

Finer managed wharfs and container freight has benefited the industry with improvements in expanding our global market reach, improved delivery times and ability to ship consistently. We have more markets which in turn improved relationships and trade networks with our customers that has seen long-term business develop and overall business growth. Australian sheep meat exporters and the government have made great in-roads in market access that will allow Australia to be a more competitive exporter and drive growth well into the future. New markets have opened with better transport as airfreights have become more prominent into countries throughout the Middle East who now receive millions of chilled bag lambs each year. Middle Eastern airlines are now flying multiple times daily to all major Australian airports allowing this market to grow every year for the last 15 years. Vacuum packed lamb has also increased substantially in volume and value, and it is now exported all over the world. Australia now supplies over 100 countries globally with total exports increasing every year for both mutton, lamb and wool. Having this global market has given processors more market options allowing them to handle carcase weights anywhere between 16kg to 40kg. This has also given farmers more options when turning off their stock but also gives them flexibility to manage their relevant season, climate and location. Free trade agreements have created and promoted stronger ties with our trading partners and eliminated certain tariffs, which has enhanced our competitiveness in the global market. Faster and improved global communications has enabled major export companies in Australia to deal directly and clearly with the end customers. This has allowed new products to be developed as markets and consumer tastes change and grow. When speaking directly with the end user we have become stronger at identifying contracts, understanding the customer and their relevant destination. With better communication, we have a clearer understanding when dealing with countries regulations and their legal environment. ​

  • Don’t miss next week when Roger Fletcher continues to examine how the industry rose from the ashes looking at processor improvements and on-farm development.
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