Carp control plans progress

Carp control plans still progressing


Life & Style
Jonah Smith of Narrabri with a European Carp from the Namoi River. Doing his bit to help remove these imports from our precious waterways.

Jonah Smith of Narrabri with a European Carp from the Namoi River. Doing his bit to help remove these imports from our precious waterways.

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For those who are interested in the progress of the National Carp Control Plan things are still progressing towards a possible 2019 release.

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With most of NSW in mild or severe drought it is no surprise to see our waterways under extreme pressure once again. It is in these times that the lure angler shines. With low water levels and increased water clarity the strike rates increase significantly along with the hook-ups. The lower water levels also reveal the usually submerged secrets that help locate the snags and holes with the naked eye.  So, if you are not already out there taking advantage of the positives during this dry time we suggest you dust off the gear and get flicking.

For those who are interested in the progress of the National Carp Control Plan things are still progressing towards a possible 2019 release. Researchers have been extremely busy gathering large amounts of data to assist the Federal and State government ministers who will decide if the $15 million plan goes ahead. It is expected that carp make up 80 to 90 per cent of the fish biomass in our Murray Darling Basin river system. This is the issue weighing on everybody’s minds on how we are going to deal with the fallout of the presumed hundreds of thousands of tonnes of dead carp. It certainly is a valid debate and one that is well represented on both sides of the fence. 

With Australia’s past lessons learnt with introducing biological control measures to deal with pest species, the National Carp Control Plan has seen unprecedented research in the effect that the release of the Koi Herpes Virus will have on the native species and the environment. Many would like to see a few more years research on this topic but it is currently on track for a Spring or early Summer release next year. This time of year would see the virus released at its most optimal time based on the water temperatures of 16 degree C to 28 degree C throughout the target areas.

The locations of release are also causing much debate due to the impacts on the local areas, but it is preferred that the release take place downstream as far as practical to assist in the handling of dead carp as the virus theoretically makes its way up stream. Areas of discussion include the lower lakes of the mouth of the Murray river, but this maybe moved to more controlled and smaller waterways to start the release if approved.

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