Timely opportunity for Bathurst retreat

Timely opportunity for Bathurst retreat


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It might not present a picture-postcard landscape at the moment, given the drought conditions gripping the Central Tablelands, but that could make it just the time to snap up the latest Bathurst offering.

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It might not present a picture-postcard landscape at the moment, given the drought conditions gripping the Central Tablelands, but that could make it just the time to snap up the latest Bathurst offering.

Adam and Maryanne Boyd are selling their Turondale Road aggregation of “Warrawee”/“Hillcrest” as part of a consolidation process.

Two years ago they sold their other property, the 300 hectare “Innisvale” at Canowindra, and now they are quitting their Bathurst property as well, to finance a move to something bigger.

But for those who don’t necessarily want anything more than a 929ha (2293ac) grazing property with lifestyle features, within 3.5 hours’ drive of Sydney, “Warrawee”/“Hillcrest” might be just the ticket.

The aggregation is being marketed for private sale by Col Medway and Richie Inglis of CBRE and can be bought either as a contiguous whole for $2.08 million, or as separate portions.

“Warrawee”, the larger of the two blocks, at 730ha, has a price tag of $1.45m and “Hillcrest”, at 198ha, is priced at $630,000.

Previously owned by Bruce Clements, “Warrawee” was purchased by the present owner about seven years ago, and “Hillcrest” was added a year or two later when it became available alongside.

Both properties boast a renovated home, cattle yards and good sheds, making them well suited as individual “getaway” blocks or as a working aggregation for an extended family.

When they still had “Innisvale”, the Boyds managed the two properties in conjunction, using the Bathurst country as a breeding base for calves they would grow out at Canowindra.

More recently they have managed the Bathurst country as a Merino breeding operation, carrying around 1250 ewes joined to Merinos and Poll Dorsets, with up to 100 cows as well in favourable seasons.

Estimated carrying capacity is 1700 DSE, although the property is now destocked.

The mainstream grazing income is augmented by harvesting of feral goats, aided by a specially fenced “capture paddock”, with up to 1000 head being turned off each year to local markets.

Situated 28 kilometres north of Bathurst (not far from the renowned Millah Murrah Angus stud), “Warrawee”/“Hillcrest” comprises mostly open, undulating grazing land and timbered ridges, with some alluvial flats.

The property has single frontage to the permanent Winburndale Rivulet and double frontage to three creeks.

Stock water is further supplied by 18 dams and an equipped bore.

Apart from the 14ha capture paddock, which is sown to phalaris, pastures are mostly native grasses and clovers, topdressed as required (72 tonnes of single super last year) to maintain productivity.

Working infrastructure across the two properties is extensive and “Warrawee” alone has a two-stand shearing shed and sheepyards and steel cattle yards as well as machinery shed/workshop, hayshed and stables.

The “Hillcrest” section has a five-bay machinery shed and steel cattle yards with three-way draft to handle 200 head.

The owners’ residence on “Warrawee” is a three-bedroom weatherboard home in a private setting with open-plan living area, reverse-cycle air conditioning and new floor coverings. 

“Hillcrest” for its part has a three-bedroom, air-conditioned home set on raised piers with an entertaining area below.

It has an updated kitchen, open plan living/dining area and covered verandah.

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