Finishing for feeder market

Finishing Poll Herefords for the feeder market


Beef
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Genetics from the Glen Innes Whiteface sale have been used in the Anderson family’s Poll Hereford herd for decades.

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GENETICS from the Glen Innes Whiteface sale have been used in the Anderson family’s Poll Hereford herd for decades.

PURE HERD: Barry Anderson runs a 170-head Poll Hereford herd a Matheson, near Glen Innes.

PURE HERD: Barry Anderson runs a 170-head Poll Hereford herd a Matheson, near Glen Innes.

Barry and Sue Anderson run a European Union-accredited herd over 820 hectares at Maids Valley, Matheson, alongside fine wool Merinos.

The Anderson family started breeding Herefords in the 1950s, and have stuck with the breed for their feed conversion.

“Herefords are good feed converters, and they're easy doing, easy handling cattle,” Mr Anderson said.

They've been buying at Glen Innes since the multi-vendor sale began, and have used genetics from a range of studs, including Academy, Lindendale, Wendouree, Grassy Mountain, Bindie Downs and Columbian studs.

“I like that you get a good range of genetics to compare in the one place,” Mr Anderson said.

“I look for bulls with breed average or above in most traits, and I like a large frame - the bigger, leggy, longer bulls.”

The Andersons run about 170 cows, with all progeny grown out to feedlot weights.

“I try got the steers as close to 500 kilograms as I can, usually around 15 months,” he said.

“The cull heifers also go to feedlots, but they're a little bit earlier, up to 420kg.

“I just want to get them as heavy as I can, as quick as possible – I leave the finishing to the feedlot.

“The steers have been going to Whyalla Beef at Texas for the past 20 years, but now they're going to Bective Feedlot.”

The breeders are run on fertilised native and improved pastures, and progeny is grazed on oats, after being yard weaned for 10 days.

Herefords are good feed converters, and they're easy doing, easy handling cattle. I like that you get a good range of genetics to compare in the one place. - Barry Anderson, Maids Valley, Matheson

It's been a tough season for the New England, but Mr Anderson hopes recent rain results in good growth.

“The oats has come up, and we had 70 millimetres of rain (last week), so hopefully it's able to put down roots, and  they're able to put down roots and we can use it soon.”

Hereford cattle have no trouble getting to the target weights on oats, Mr Anderson said.

“Last year the steers averaged 480kg at 15 months.”

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