Rosecomb is a true bantam

Distinctive features helps the Rosecomb standout in the crowd

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In earlier days, the Rosecomb achieved the highest pitch of perfection ever achieved in exhibition birds and many birds still have this level of quality about them today.

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RESPLENDENT: The Rosecomb is a glorious of show bird which stands out in the show pen.

RESPLENDENT: The Rosecomb is a glorious of show bird which stands out in the show pen.

The Rosecomb is a glorious example of a show bird.

In earlier days it achieved the highest pitch of perfection ever achieved in exhibition birds and many birds still have this level of quality about them today.

The bird has a resplendent rosecomb and it stands out in the show pen. The breed has ardent admirers and breeders and you should be able to get some good stock to begin with from a variety of sources.

Originally the breed was thought to have developed in Java, but the birds we have today were bred to a state of perfection in Britain. For a tiny breed they do lay a solid white to cream egg, but it’s main feature is, of course, the comb and the white lobes.

The Rosecomb comes in black, the most widespread and popular colour, white and blue. The black has proven most successful in the show pen, but the Rosecomb Club Show has a good display of the other colours and is highly recommended.

The breed carries itself proudly and is an extremely neat and attractive bird.

The best breeders have separate pullet and cockerel breeding pens, but this isn’t necessary for the beginner or the backyard fancier.

Breeders have been developing other colours such as cuckoos and duckwings and the trick here is to remain true to the type of the breed.  

The breed is quite hardy and although one of the smallest breeds are good mothers and the hens will set eggs and see them through.

The Rosecomb is a small breed and it is wise not to overcrowd them, although pens can be smaller.

The breed has a strong following in Australia and the Rosecomb Club is strong.

If you are interested in the breed, you can find the club on Facebook and begin your hunt for stock there.

This attractive and active bird would be a great asset to any fanciers pens or as a breed for those hampered by space.

ASK BRUCE

I read with interest the article on the Japanese Bantam. I live just out of Bathurst ,and wonder if it is possible to buy them in our area? Are they easy to look after and how are they wandering in the garden? Are they very destructive? Denise

Denise,

Japanese are a rare breed, but i'm sure that you can get some in your area. Bathurst have a poultry club that uses the showgrounds and Mudgee also have a strong club (mudgeepoultryandpigeonclub@gmail.com). For a more direct contact, try the Japanese Bantam Club website. To answer your second question, all poultry can be destructive of gardens if not managed correctly, but a few breeders I know have Japanese on the lawns at home.

Bruce.

  • Email smartfarmer@theland.com.au
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