Producers need to embrace technology or risk seeing their businesses perish

Producers need to embrace technology or risk seeing their businesses perish


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It is becoming increasingly clear that a greater integration of technology will be needed in order for the industry to remain sustainable.

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Story sponsored by Harrington Systems Electronics.

We've all heard it before: "Look, you just need to find a way to do more with less". But with challenging conditions and the demand for agricultural products increasing by the day, the sad reality for many producers is they need to do just that. 

The truth is: Australia's agricultural sector is going through a period of tremendous change. And, how we respond today will be pivotal to our future prosperity or decline as a nation. 

It's a heavy burden. Add to that the challenges of accelerating climate change, a global population which is exploding and the federal government's ambitious plan to make agriculture a $1oob a year industry by 2050, and you can see the mammoth task facing producers. 

For many, especially on the East Coast, this year has been tough. The drought has been crippling, electricity prices are through the roof and the few dollars they had tucked away for contingencies quickly evaporated. 

It is becoming increasingly clear that a greater integration of technology will be needed in order for the industry to remain sustainable. 

Few know this better than Queensland cattle farmer turned innovator William Harrington (pictured). Mr Harrington’s family owns and operates Olga Downs Station just north of Richmond in North West Queensland which has been in his family since 1936,  however in 2005 he founded his own tech company.

The 33-year-old computer systems engineer says he did so out of necessity to help with property management. Monitoring water levels in the property troughs involves labour, fuel and can be a hot and dry task.     

So, he decided to create the technology to help remotely monitor the levels of each trough on the property. The investment has saved the family thousands of dollars a year and can help other farmers do the same.

With the intense drought that is currently gripping Australia, the technology is saving time, money and businesses.

“Everyone is so busy with the drought feeding their animals that they don’t have the time to check troughs as frequently as we should be,” Mr Harrington said.

“You need water. Because in this weather – if you don’t have water – you’re not going to have too many animals left.”

Starting form $1800 you can pick up a camera system which runs on mobile technology.

Mr Harrington said the full-scale integration of both technology and automation is going to be essential for the long-term sustainability of the agricultural industry including corporate and family run businesses.

“You can’t just sit on your hands and keep doing what you used to do because your grandfather did it. You just can’t get away with that anymore,” Mr Harrington said.

“Business that doesn’t embrace technology and actively try to improve what they’re doing in their business is going to be left behind and sadly won’t be around too much longer.”

Mr Harrington hopes his efforts can affect positive change and shape how farmers embrace technology. By combining old and new, he says, it is possible to save valuable time which could be better spent with family.

For more information on Harrington Systems Electronics full product range click here.

Story sponsored by Harrington Systems Electronics.

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