Joy of contribution and achievements

Joy of contribution and achievement


Opinion
Aa

Dan Korff stepped off the Future Farmers’ Network board last month and this is his last column for The Land. Photo by Margie McClelland.

Aa
Dan Korff stepped off the Future Farmers’ Network board last month and this is his last column for The Land. Photo by Margie McClelland.

Dan Korff stepped off the Future Farmers’ Network board last month and this is his last column for The Land. Photo by Margie McClelland.

The only constant in the world is change. 

As such, after seven years on the board of Future Farmers’ Network (FFN) I stepped off the board in November and will hence stop writing this column. 

Times like these automatically trigger a series of reflection (whether we are aware of them or not), which I can openly admit I find somewhat daunting.

Not dissimilar to many circumstantial changes we find ourselves facing all the time, either of our own choice or not.

There’s always a few questions that start playing in our minds. 

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a piece on conducting autopsies of a situation.

I might take my own advice because the overall feeling is pride in what I have been able to achieve.

From the people I have met to the initiatives we have instigated and the members we have who make up the network and the extreme power, positivity and knowledge of FFN. 

One of my favourite times of the year on the FFN calendar is when we open the call for new directors.

I have been very lucky to have met these people and learn about what they have done, what they’re doing and what their aspirations for the future are.

This year was no exception and I am so proud of the entire board in what they have achieved in their personal careers thus far and excited about how they are going to steer FFN into the future. 

Succession is hard, but it is also exciting if you let it be. 

I am a firm believer that the bush is one of the best places in today’s world for the appreciation and development of rock-solid values and work ethic.

It has always been the case.

It is this that has driven and continues to drive my dedication to doing whatever I can to ensure the communities and industries I am involved in, remain vibrant. 

We will see more urban businesses move west of the divide in the next 10 years.

And the opportunity for those out there who cannot physically work somewhere, be able to start to do so again.

The level of unused skill in the bush is criminal. Get ready. 

FFN is a great organisation that, like all today, must remain nimble and adaptive.

This is always a challenge – and as such, please do continue to get in touch with the directors and staff and voice your opinions and ideas.

Your input and feedback – positive and negative – are appreciated, and not just for FFN but for all organisations who you may be a stakeholder or beneficiary of. 

I’ll sign off personally with great thanks and appreciation to the many people I have met and developed strong relationships in my time with FFN.

There are everyone from members, directors, partners, staff, industry legends and everyone else who doesn’t fall under any one category. 

I look forward to seeing you all around the traps! 

Aa

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