Fish rescue mission at Menindee

Murray Cod rescued in two-hour operation at Menindee


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NSW fisheries officers rescuing fish including Murray Cod near Menindee. Photos by NSW Department of Primary Industries.

NSW fisheries officers rescuing fish including Murray Cod near Menindee. Photos by NSW Department of Primary Industries.

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Murray Cod were among the 80 fish rescued and relocated by Department of Primary Industries fisheries officers near Menindee.

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Murray Cod were among the 80 fish relocated by NSW fisheries officers as part of a two-hour rescue operation near Menindee today.

It only took a 20 metre walk for NSW fisheries officers to relocate some of the stressed fish from a shallow isolated pool to a location downstream that included an aerator and where the water quality was more “favourable”.

The fisheries officers delicately released the fish that were caught by hand using nets before they swam off.

“Dealing with stressed fish and working in water always requires great care,” a NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) spokesperson said.

“Our priority is to relocate these native fish as safely and efficiently as possible. Fortunately all fish safely swam away today once they were released.” 

NSW fisheries officers rescuing fish including Murray Cod near Menindee. Photos by NSW Department of Primary Industries.

NSW fisheries officers rescuing fish including Murray Cod near Menindee. Photos by NSW Department of Primary Industries.

Of the fish that were relocated downstream from the spillway near Weir 32, there were 16 Murray Cod, 15 Silver Perch and eight Golden Perch.

An additional 20 Silver Perch and 20 Golden Perch were taken to Narrandera Fisheries Centre for broodstock.

It comes after 20 Murray Cod were rescued from the area last week and transferred to the Narrandera Fisheries Centre.

“These fish are in good health and adjusting to new surroundings,” a DPI spokesperson said.

“This is DPI’s last planned rescue possible from the Lower Darling River, however the department will continue to monitor conditions and respond accordingly.”

“Relocating fish is generally not the preferred response because of the additional pressure it places on already stressed fish, however the unique circumstances during these dry and hot conditions have necessitated the use of a variety of management responses.”

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