Views a bonus on Bundella's 'Makiwa'

Views a bonus on Bundella's 'Makiwa'

Property
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A choice grazing property on the south-western fringes of the Liverpool Plains is expected to find a new owner this month when the Kuhn family moves on after 30 productive years.

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A choice grazing property on the south-western fringes of the Liverpool Plains is expected to find a new owner this month when the Kuhn family moves on after 30 productive years.

Cameron Pastoral Agents has listed for sale Makiwa, the Bundella property of Martin and Megan Kuhn and their son Marcus.

Expressions of interest are invited by May 21 for a property that combines viable scale, production versatility, quality infrastructure and lifestyle appeal.

Situated 92kms west of Quirindi and 35km north-east of Coolah, Makiwa occupies a favoured pastoral area where its neighbours include the well-known properties Rockgedgiel and Kurrajong Park.

Comprising mostly gently sloping and low hill country of black to chocolate basalt soils, with a steeper section on the southern boundary, Makiwa has a predominantly north-easterly aspect.

Most of the property is accessible to four-wheel-drive, while its several sheltered valleys make it an ideal environment for pasture growth and livestock breeding.

Average rainfall is around 650mm and its proximity to the Coolah Tops high country means it often benefits from rains that don't make it to the plains below.

An area of about 140ha is farmed annually, growing winter and summer crops for livestock finishing in rotation with lucerne and other pastures, and a further 40ha was cultivated in the past.

Over the past 20 years the sulphur-based fertiliser SF45 has been applied regularly, with the whole property receiving 100kg/ha every four years. Gypsum has also been applied where appropriate.

Under present ownership, the property has been managed flexibly as a mixed sheep and cattle operation, with Meat Merinos for wool and prime lamb production and an Angus breeding herd.

Numbers of sheep and cattle have fluctuated in response to markets and seasons, with cattle progeny being either finished on crop or grown to feeder weights, and lambs being crop-fattened.

If managed as an all-breeding cattle operation, the owners estimate the property in normal seasons would support a herd of 400 cows.

Water is a feature of the property, with a well on Coxs Creek and two bores (all solar powered) piping to header tanks for reticulation to 22 paddock troughs, supplemented by 12 dams.

A key selling point of Makiwa is the homestead, extensively renovated by the present owners and set amid established trees, lawns and gardens with views over the surrounding plains.

The weatherboard-and-Colorbond home has four bedrooms, open-plan kitchen and living areas, ducted air conditioning, paved entertaining area and an adjacent double garage/coolroom.

Working structures include a three-stand, raised board shearing shed (and adjoining weather shed to hold 1000 woolies), steel and timber sheep and cattle yards with covered work area, machinery and hay sheds, workshop and two new 35-tonne HE silos.

Based on district sales, expressions of interest for Makiwa are expected to be received in a range upwards of $3750/ha ($1500/ac).

By PETER AUSTIN.

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