Tackle pesky weeds in winter

Tackle pesky weeds in winter


Life & Style
A courtyard in Judy and Chris Bayliss's garden enjoys a long season of beauty and interest.

A courtyard in Judy and Chris Bayliss's garden enjoys a long season of beauty and interest.

Aa

Fiona Ogilvie loves weeding in winter, because she knows nothing much will germinate before spring.

Aa

A sunny, still June day is a great inducement to gardening.

It was 4 degrees outside after breakfast, but as no less than three millimetres of rain fell yesterday - oh the excitement - I was anxious to tackle the weeding.

I love weeding in winter as I know nothing much will germinate before spring.

This means that once it's done, I can assess how much space I actually have (as distinct from what I imagine I have or would like to have) for the plants piled up in my propagation corner.

June is a perfect time for planting being the start of winter dormancy in the garden, especially after a shower of rain which seems to be all we can hope for at present.

Bare rooted stock is coming into nurseries from now on and is considerably cheaper than its potted equivalent, so it pays to seize the day.

Don't forget to include bare rooted roses in your shopping list. They can be half or less the price of a pot grown rose.

This year thanks to the generally mild winter I still have roses in flower.

I noticed how lovely a coffee coloured 'Julia's Rose' looked in a jar with a stem of my old favourite, velvety, blackish crimson 'Josephine Bruce'.

I've made a note to self to move Julia to a spot near Josephine in the garden, or better still, buy a new Julia, as roses take a couple of seasons to regain size after moving.

June is a perfect time for planting being the start of winter dormancy in the garden, especially after a shower of rain which seems to be all we can hope for at present. - Fiona Ogilvie

When relocating a deciduous shrub, including a rose, try to lift as much soil as possible so that it doesn't lose too many of its tiny outer feeding roots.

A reduced root system will struggle to support the growth above ground, so you may need to cut back the plant to allow for this.

It's always tempting to take a few hardwood cuttings after trimming a shrub in winter.

Take a 25 centimetre length from this season's wood, remove the tip, push it two-thirds into the ground in a shady corner and keep damp.

It may take up to 18 months to root, but there's nothing so rewarding as a plant you have propagated yourself.

Cut back old hellebore (H. orientalis) and leave now to allow space for new growth and winter flowers.

June is the time to pot up lilies for Christmas.

The traditional pure white Lilium longiflorum flowers in mid-December, and I can never resist a few Orientals for their delicious scent.

Bulbs are available from mail order nurseries now.

June is a good time to assess any design changes you might like to make to the garden.

I recently admired a courtyard in Judy and Chris Bayliss's large rural garden near Bathurst.

The couple have created an outdoor eating area which takes full advantage of autumn colour, thus extending its season of interest well into May.

Judy and Chris Bayliss's garden will open for Bathurst Spring Spectacular 2019, hosted by the Bathurst Garden Club. Visit www.bathurstgardenclub.org.au for more information about the two-day event, which is held the weekend of October 26-27. Entry is $25 (seniors $20) for 10 gardens. Net proceeds go to local charities.

Aa

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