Going out on a high

Marrar farmer sells his final pen of lambs for $314


Sales
David Fox, Brigadoon, Marrar sold his last pen of lambs for $314 a head. The fourth generation farming family have transitioned from sheep to cropping.

David Fox, Brigadoon, Marrar sold his last pen of lambs for $314 a head. The fourth generation farming family have transitioned from sheep to cropping.

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Fourth generation farmers transition from sheep to cropping

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David Fox from Marrar has ended more than forty years as a sheep producer on a high, selling his last pen of lambs for $314 a head, the highest price they've ever fetched.

"It was a little goal of mine to get a three in front of the last pen so we can remember it fondly," Mr Fox said.

His pen of second cross lambs, weighing 75kg plus, went under the hammer at the Wagga Saleyards on Thursday.

Mr Fox said along with his son Dan, they were transitioning from a dual purpose operation to an all cropping enterprise.

Unlike most top-selling, heavy lambs the last of the Foxes lambs were not feedlotted.

"They were lambed last August, this pen was what was left over," Mr Fox said.

"They were wandering around a 200-240 hectare paddock for a couple of months on lentil and cereal stubbles and I gave them some barley over the last week.

"There was no feeding regime but it was a big area to very few sheep."

Mr Fox said although it was the highest price he had seen, he had sold heavier lambs of up to 85kg previously which had topped at around $250 a head.

"At one stage we were breeding 2000 ewes, then after the drought we sort of settled down to 1600," he said.

"For the last few years, we've just let them age and then sold."

He said the decision to move on from sheep, which he has been working with since he was seven-years-old, was not a difficult one despite the high prices on offer.

"The younger generation were more interested in tractors than sheep," he said.

"But it wasn't a problem for me at all and I'm excited to hopefully get a bit more of a lifestyle and for what we're doing with the cropping.

"We're trying to bring a bit of diversity, stubble retention and zero till practices in, just really making no compromises towards our cropping enterprise."

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