Roo collisions on the increase: NRMA

Winter is the worst time for animal collisions, Dubbo hotspot


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Severe damage from a collision with a roo.

Severe damage from a collision with a roo.

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Over 14,000 vehicle collisions with animals last year: NRMA

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Car collisions with kangaroos are on the rise with NRMA receiving 14,500 claims for collisions with animals last year, with kangaroo collisions providing 92 per cent of the claims, a 20 per cent increase from 2017.

The Dubbo area is the major hotspot for animal collisions in the state and winter is the riskiest time, NRMA data shows.

Roo damage.

Roo damage.

The NRMA said kangaroos made up 92.5 per cent of the top five most commonly hit animals on the road with 12,922 of them involved in a crash just last year. This was followed by wombats (478 hit on the road), cattle (286), dogs (154) and cats (133).

Graph courtesy of Western Advocate.

Graph courtesy of Western Advocate.

NRMA Insurance Research Specialist Chris Emerson warned drivers to be mindful of wildlife on the roads.

Roo damage. Photos supplied by NRMA.

Roo damage. Photos supplied by NRMA.

"If you're heading out any time over winter, it's really important that drivers are on the lookout for wildlife on the roads - particularly at dawn and dusk," Mr Emerson said.

"If you spot an animal on the road while driving, remember to brake but don't swerve as this may cause a collision with other cars. When driving in an area where animals could be present, take note of any signage about local wildlife and slow down.

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"Wildlife can be unpredictable and often drivers won't get prior warning before an animal appears in front of them. Colliding with wildlife is not only traumatic for both the animal and driver but can cause considerable damage to cars and also result in injury."

Kangaroos are most likely to be involved in a road accident, followed by dogs, wombats, cattle and cats.

Dubbo was the most likely area in NSW for animal collisions, followed by Goulburn, Mudgee and Cooma.

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