Just how high can the lamb market climb? | Stock Talk

Stock Talk | Just how high can the lamb market climb?

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Tight supplies, as old season lamb number dwindle, will undoubtedly keep prices high through the next few months with early suckers a way off yet and numbers of same could well be tempered by the seasonal conditions.

Tight supplies, as old season lamb number dwindle, will undoubtedly keep prices high through the next few months with early suckers a way off yet and numbers of same could well be tempered by the seasonal conditions.

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Lamb prices have launched themselves into the stratosphere to the extent they look like they could well be in a permanent orbit!

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AFTER an extended break we are back into stock talk columns.

One would have hope that in the intervening period between columns we would have seen a major improvement in seasonal conditions across the state.

Unfortunately this, once again, fails to be the case.

While hand to mouth falls have made many areas, especially in the southern regions, come through late autumn early winter in fairly reasonable shape.

The majority of the state is still firmly in the grips of the big dry.

All areas will be looking for significant falls over coming weeks or spring will be in jeopardy for all.

The sheep and lamb market, as we all know, has continued to be the star performer for the livestock sector.

Prices have launched themselves into the stratosphere to the extent they look like they could well be in a permanent orbit!

Once upon a time and not all that long ago, anything over the 600 cents a kilogram mark seemed to be unsustainable whereas now days 800c/kg seems to a relief for the processing sector.

I've always been of the opinion if first-cross ewes are your game you should be replacing every year regardless of price and running with the averages.

Tight supplies, as old season lamb number dwindle, will undoubtedly keep prices high through the next few months with early suckers a way off yet and numbers of same could well be tempered by the seasonal conditions ahead.

The big question now on many producers and agents minds pertaining to the market is where does this leave ewe prices as we head towards the end of the year.

Given any sort of spring you would think the $300 mark could well be commonplace. Regardless of where the level is you can be certain demand will be high and supplies will be tight.

In these scenarios I have often seen prime lamb producers make the error of deciding not to replace old sheep because they feel the market is too dear.

Their drama occurs when the following year sheep are just as dear and all of a sudden a major percentage of their flock are past their used by date.

I've always been of the opinion if first-cross ewes are your game you should be replacing every year regardless of price and running with the averages.

In closing a worrying development that has been occurring recently and one that all should be aware of.

During the past couple of weeks I have heard of several incidents of clients email accounts being hacked and agent invoice being intercepted and tampered with.

The hackers have changed bank account details on the invoices and then sent on to the client who have received the invoices as if they had still come from the agency and only through some amount of luck was the tampering discovered.

Agencies don't change bank details without notification. Please be aware and alert. Make sure your online security is up to date.

The rural sector apparently appears as a soft target to the hackers and the incidents are on the rise.

Always, if in doubt call and question before you just hit send and launch your hard earned into ether.

  • Ben Emms is a director of Ray White Emms Mooney, Blayney, and a member of Australian Livestock and Property Agents (ALPA).
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