Lowlines are using size to their advantage

Lowlines are using size to their advantage


Farming Small Areas News
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A project at the Trangie Research Centre has developed into a breed which is a very viable option for producers on smaller properties.

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WELL SUITED: Due to their efficiency and size, Australian Lowlines are a good match for smaller operations.

WELL SUITED: Due to their efficiency and size, Australian Lowlines are a good match for smaller operations.

A project at the Trangie Research Centre has developed into a breed which is a very viable option for producers on smaller properties.

Top Angus cattle were imported from Canada in 1929 and were joined with herd sires from the US, Scotland and some top local bulls to create the Australian Lowline.

After the herd was closed in 1969, they were divided into three groups based on yearling growth rate - high line, low line and control line.

After 15 years, the low line cattle were approximately 30 per cent smaller than the high line herd.

The low line herd was sold on the open market, beginning the Lowline breed.

Speaking at the Mudgee Small Farm Field Days, Bill Brydon, Barrenjoey, said their size makes the Lowlines a good option for smaller sized operations.

"They are about 60% the size of Angus," he said.

"Lowlines are a beef breed which are great for small properties as they are more efficient than bigger breeds, producing more meat to the bone.

"At 22 months they go to market at between 320 and 350 kilograms.

"Lowline meat is in strong demand with premium butchers looking to get it.

"It is a beautifully marbled meat with good fat."

Mr Brydon said that as well as the efficiency and quality of meat, Lowlines offer other advantages as well.

"Because of their reduced size, you can carry more," he said.

"Their smaller size, and docile nature, means they don't knock you around as much and they are easier on the environment as well.

"They produce a smaller calf which makes for easier calving. Rarely do I need to pull a calf.

"Many producers use Lowline bulls to cover larger breeds, especially on first year heifers.

"They get more calves on the ground and the heifer is in a better condition too."

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