A mixed up week of snow, smoke and dust

A mixed up week of snow, smoke and dust | Weather In Focus


News
Aa

While a mix of contrasting weather is not uncommon in NSW during spring, it was unusual to see it all occurring in a relatively confined area on the same day earlier this week.

Aa

It's been a real mixed bag of weather across NSW this week, with bushfires, dust storms, snow and frost.

While a mix of contrasting weather is not uncommon in NSW during spring, it was unusual to see it all occurring in a relatively confined area on the same day earlier this week.

On Monday, a surge of cold air and strong southwesterly winds swept across NSW, driven by a low pressure system in the Tasman Sea.

This surge of wind fanned large bushfires in north-eastern NSW, prompting emergency warnings on and east of the Northern Tablelands, where fires had been burning throughout Saturday and Sunday.

Smoke from these fires could be seen billowing across the Tasman Sea throughout Monday.

Blustery winds also whipped up large areas and raised dust across parched inland regions of NSW earlier this week.

A cloud of airborne dirt could be seen travelling through central western and north western NSW on Monday, some of which became entrained in bushfire smoke over the state's north east.

The cold air sweeping over NSW on Monday also caused snow to reach the ground along the Great Dividing Range.

The heaviest snow occurred in the south, although there was some settling snow over the Central Tablelands and flakes were even seen falling near Armidale and Ebor.

At one stage during Monday afternoon, bushfires, dust storms and snow were all occurring at the same time over northern NSW.

Clear skies and lighter winds during the middle of the week caused a string of cold and frosty mornings over some inland districts.

Tuesday morning's minimum of -4 degrees Celsius in Parkes was its lowest September temperature in at least 21 years.

Looking ahead, most of NSW will see predominantly dry weather during the remainder of this week under the influence of a dominant ridge of high pressure.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by