Passionate about ag, beef industry

ARCBA: Passionate about ag, beef industry

Beef
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Brahman delegates from ARCBA conference.

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Open to opportunities in beef industry

Emma Oppermann is an agricultural teacher and she's looking to improve her skills and knowledge of the beef industry.

Emma Oppermann is an agricultural teacher and she's looking to improve her skills and knowledge of the beef industry.

Queensland teacher Emma Oppermann has been passionate about the beef industry for years and she's passing her interest on to the next generation.

The 28-year-old has a small stud, Tango E Brahmans, run alongside her parents' Tango Brahman stud, based at Gayndah, Queensland.

She's also an agriculture and biology teacher at Moura, but she'll be transferring to Charters Towers at the start of next year.

She always wanted to be a teacher, but completed an agricultural degree which gives her more opportunities in the industry.

Earlier this year, Miss Oppermann was one of 15 pioneers selected from the 68 teacher applicants for Central Queensland University's Women in Agri-Tech program.

The program aims to create a strong network of female teachers who will become leaders in digital literacy, STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and entrepreneurship in regional, rural and remote areas.

While she enjoys teaching, Miss Oppermann is also open to further opportunities in the beef industry.

"Ag is my passion, and beef is my main focus, so I want to increase my skills and knowledge in that area," she said.

On farm, both studs have had to decrease numbers, with the dry conditions forcing the Oppermanns to focus on improving genetics.

"We're using poll bloodlines where we can, and we're trying to get length, bone and overall softness so they've got plenty of growth," Miss Oppermann said.

"We're already starting to see a difference with the calves we have on the ground. We're really impressed with them."

Maternal focus for Brenton's Hardacre Brahmans stud

Brenton Sewell is new to the industry, but has established a small stud focusing on high quality females.

Brenton Sewell is new to the industry, but has established a small stud focusing on high quality females.

Brenton Sewell is new to the agricultural industry, but in the past five years he and his wife Emma have set up a small stud, along with managing a large commercial herd for her parents, Owen and Lee Scott.

The Scotts run a high grade Brahman herd, based at Mallawa Station, Clermont, and the Sewells have 40 registered breeders under the Hardacre Brahmans prefix.

Mr Sewell is a carpenter by trade, and was working in construction at Darwin before the couple returned to Clermont five years ago, and had the opportunity to start their own herd.

"Owen and Lee buy some really handy bulls to breed their own commercial bulls, so we thought we'd make the most of those bulls to breed a registered herd," he said.

"We're pretty lucky to have that opportunity."

Mr Sewell said his focus is breeding a high quality female herd.

"I don't really think my females are good enough yet, but with every year they're getting better and better."

Stud and commercial interest for Cody

Cody Sheahan, pictured with son Ryle at Ingham, Queensland.

Cody Sheahan, pictured with son Ryle at Ingham, Queensland.

Cody Sheahan manages one of the country's oldest Brahman studs, Tropical Cattle, while also owning a stud of 300 breeders, Midway Brahmans, with his wife Holly.

Mr Sheahan is based at Ingham and has a commercial background, growing up with cattle and sugarcane.

The Sheahans established Midway Brahmans in 2016, running the stud herd on Mr Sheahan's father's property.

He's also been managing Tropical Cattle for almost five years, running the stud herd as well as a large commercial herd.

"We supply a lot of herd bulls for larger places in northern Australia," Mr Sheahan said.

"We do a lot of artificial insemination and IVF because we're always looking for new genetics and ways to improve.

"We artificially inseminated 400 cows a couple of months ago, which is good for herd management having calves, then weaning all at once.

"It streamlines our management and allows us to finetune genetics, because we have access to different bulls, to find an animal that complements each cow. We also AI a lot of the commercial herd, and I'm able to use that knowledge in my stud."

Mr Sheahan said the herd had a strong emphasis on polled cattle.

"Everybody is shifting towards polled Brahmans now, because it's less labour and animal welfare, and it's better for the live export market."

A long history in Brahman breed

Lucie-Anne Kirk is heading to the US in January for a three month tour which includes visits to studs and the Houston Livestock Show.

Lucie-Anne Kirk is heading to the US in January for a three month tour which includes visits to studs and the Houston Livestock Show.

Lucie-Anne Kirk's family has a long history with the Brahman breed, with her grandparents Ted and Grace Kirk establishing stud herd 39, Hazelton Brahmans, in 1961.

The stud is based at Hazelton, Gayndah, but Miss Kirk has more involvement with the commercial operation, running Blackwood near Middlemount.

The 21-year-old works full-time on the organically certified property, while also studying primary teaching via distance education.

"We've had organic accreditation for six or seven years because all our farming practices were organic anyway, and the block down south has been EU-accredted for about 20 years," Miss Kirk said.

Miss Kirk has been heavily involved in the cattle industry all her life, on farm and in the show ring.

She competed in junior judging throughout her secondary education at Rockhampton Grammar and has exhibited her own animals and won classes at Sydney Royal Easter Show.

"I studied ag all the way through school and I love showing cattle and judging.

"This year I was associate judge at the EKKA for the Brahman feature show which was a great experience."

Miss Kirk will have the chance to learn more about the beef industry after receiving the Edgar Hudgins Scholarship from the Australian Brahman Breeders Association. She will head to the US in January for a three month tour.

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