Future of Angus breed in safe hands

ARCBA: Future of Angus breed in safe hands

Beef
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Angus delegates from ARCBA conference.

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Ruby's passion for cattle, family

Ruby Canning, Mortlake, Vic, is the sixth generation of her family to be actively involved in seedstock beef production. Photo by Emma Jane Industry

Ruby Canning, Mortlake, Vic, is the sixth generation of her family to be actively involved in seedstock beef production. Photo by Emma Jane Industry

Hailing from Mortlake in Victoria, Ruby Canning's list of experience in the beef industry is extensive including cattle breeder, judge, livestock and agriculture photographer, show parader and student.

Seedstock production has been the focus so far, and Miss Canning is the sixth generation of her family to be involved in the beef industry.

"My father grew up in Alberta, Canada, where he raised Angus and Salers cattle, while my mother's father, Peter Schembri, established our family's Maverick Simmental stud in the 1970s," Miss Canning said.

"My grandfather's love and passion for livestock, particularly for cattle, inspired me to carry on his legacy."

Miss Canning is now co-owner of Mavstar Simmentals alongside her brother Jacob, and helps with her parent's stud operations.

"We also run a commercial herd, having great success with Sim Angus crosses, and my brother and I are actively involved within the Angus breed," she said.

"I will always be grateful for the opportunities that I have had through Angus Australia, I believe their youth programs are outstanding."

Currently Miss Canning is studying a Bachelor of Business at UNE. She is also kept busy with her livestock photography business and works for Te Mania Angus during university holidays.

Miss Canning has been actively involved with showing her family's cattle since she was young and has exhibited cattle at many major shows around Australia. Her biggest highlight so far was winning the National Champion Beef Cattle Parader in 2016.

"Showing is a family tradition and we pride ourselves on presenting quality home-bred and owned cattle that are functional, efficient and profitable."

Genomics the key to future of beef

Damien Thomson, Shacorrah-Dalu Angus, Berremangra, NSW, is looking forward to expanding his family's stud operations.

Damien Thomson, Shacorrah-Dalu Angus, Berremangra, NSW, is looking forward to expanding his family's stud operations.

With his University of New England studies nearly complete, Damien Thomson is looking forward to returning home to play a more active role in his family's Shacorrah-Dalu Angus stud.

Mr Thomson and his family have been running a 300-head commercial Angus herd on their property at Berremangra, NSW, since 1998, and established a stud about 10 years ago, selling bulls locally.

He is in the last six months of a Bachelor of Agriculture and Resource Economics degree at UNE, Armidale, and next year plans to combine a job at ABARE with work on the family farm.

Mr Thomson is keen to expand the Angus stud from its current base of 50 breeders, using some of the new technologies available to more accurately select high-performing genetics.

"I think the influence of genomics in cattle breeding is very exciting," he said.

"Being able to predict how an animal's progeny will perform before the calves are even on the ground will be very valuable."

Family has also had a significant influence on Damien, and with five brothers and sisters heavily involved, he is looking forward to sharing the day-to-day management of the farm and stud with them.

Production focus for Rebecca

Rebecca George, Nevertire, NSW, hopes to one day have her own Angus stud, breeding hardy bulls suited to the harsh environment of western NSW.

Rebecca George, Nevertire, NSW, hopes to one day have her own Angus stud, breeding hardy bulls suited to the harsh environment of western NSW.

Rebecca George, Forest Grove, Nevertire, NSW, is a fourth generation commercial Angus breeder who hopes to eventually take over her parent's property in partnership with her sister Diana.

"It is a long term goal for my sister and I to establish an Angus stud, she said.

"But our main focus will be on continuing to breed and produce top quality Angus beef and commercial replacement females.

"We're both really interested in genetics and hope to one day be producing hardy bulls that can perform in harsh environments such as western NSW."

Miss George's involvement with the beef industry began when she was just six years old, competing at the Angus Youth National Roundup.

Since then, she has spent many years on the show circuit, successfully presenting cattle at the Sydney Royal Easter Show and as part of her school's cattle showing team. She is also now on the Angus Youth Roundup's management committee.

"I love cattle and breeding cattle, but something that always keeps bringing me back to showing and the broader beef industry is the people and the opportunities in it," Miss George said.

"There are so many great people that want to help and support you and there are lots of opportunities, such as the Young Breed Leaders Workshop, for young people to expand their knowledge and skills."

Miss George has just finished a double degree in Agriculture and Business at the UNE, Armidale, and is on the lookout for employment in the agricultural industry, which she hopes to combine with working on her family's farm.

"My main area of interest is the various marketing options available, such has selling through saleyards, direct or on AuctionsPlus and how producers can create an on-farm management strategy so they are consistently hitting market specifications."

Youth program fosters new skills

Candice Liddle, Walcha, NSW, says her role as the events and youth development officer for Angus Australia is extremely rewarding.

Candice Liddle, Walcha, NSW, says her role as the events and youth development officer for Angus Australia is extremely rewarding.

Growing up on large sheep and cattle stations that her family worked on in the New England region of NSW has cemented Candice Liddle's passion for agriculture and beef cattle production.

She now combines a busy job as the events and youth development officer at Angus Australia with running a grazing property at Walcha, NSW, alongside her husband Stephen, producing quality wool, prime lambs and beef cattle.

"I like that we can be a part of breeding the best cattle we can to contribute to producing better quality beef products," she said.

Mrs Liddle describes her job at Angus Australia as "extremely rewarding" .

"I get to play a role in encouraging youth into the beef industry and develop their skills to hopefully one day become industry leaders."

She said the knowledge gained from the line-up of high calibre speakers at the Young Breed Leaders workshop had been very valuable.

"I also really enjoyed meeting other like-minded and driven people."

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