Heifers sell to $1500 at Wodonga

Prices rise again at Wodonga with heifers 30-40 cents dearer

Beef
Aa

Another large yarding, 2552 cattle on offer.

Aa
There was a lot of competition for feeder steers and heifers at this week's Wodonga store sale, prices for heifers rising by 30-40 cents per kilogram. Photo: NVLX.

There was a lot of competition for feeder steers and heifers at this week's Wodonga store sale, prices for heifers rising by 30-40 cents per kilogram. Photo: NVLX.

The market rose again at Wodonga this week, a large yarding of 2552 cattle selling from 20 to 40 cents dearer than a fortnight ago, prices driven by restocker and feedlot confidence to the north and south.

There was a small number of cows on offer but what was there attracted impressive prices.

Judy Brewer, Wodonga, Victoria sold 11 Angus cows weighing 644 kilograms for $2520 a head.

Corcoran Parker livestock agent, Bo Helwig said heavier black calves, weighing 350-400kg sold from 360-380 cents per kilogram.

Dean Hill, Bullioh, Victoria offered 25 Angus steers, weighing 391kg, which sold for $1410.

Mr Helwig said lighter black calves, weighing under 350kg made from 360-400c/kg, while Hereford steers made 360-390c/kg with the odd pen cracking 400c/kg.

He said feeder steers were also very strong, heavier steers selling from 350-380c/kg.

J and G Leader, Mansfield, Victoria sold a pen of five Red Angus steers weighing 536kg for $1720/hd, their following pen of 15 Angus steers weighing 544 making the same price.

Mr Helwig said the heifer market was the stand out feature of the sale, heifers selling for 30 to 40 cents dearer than a fortnight ago.

"It was a drastic improvement," Mr Helwig said.

"In the feeder heifers, 350kg and above, there was probably half a dozen guys trying to buy the same article."

He said prices for domestic market heifers were from 320-340c/kg, while weaner heifers sold from 315-350c/kg irrespective of weight or breed.

Mr Helwig said his guess was that they would yard another couple of thousand cattle in two weeks time.

"At the moment the prices keep bringing them out," he said.

"There's a lot of confidence in the job obviously since the rain and people north of us have got feed.

"People in the north who got rain three weeks ago have a lot more confidence then we do at the moment.

"In our part of the world people still won't have feed for the next couple of months, they're still feeding cattle."

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by