Prototype planter on display

Gason to launch T12000 planter at Wimmera

Machinery
Tom McCluskey with Gason's new planter at the recent Wimmera Machinery Field Days.

Tom McCluskey with Gason's new planter at the recent Wimmera Machinery Field Days.

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Gason will launch its new T12000 planter bar at Wimmera

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Gason unveiled its new planter bar, designed and built at its Ararat factory, at the Wimmera Machinery Field Days last week.

The T12000 follows six months of product development and testing, and AF Gason design engineer Tom McCluskey said the company's strong focus on reliability and durability had continued.

"We want to sell a seeder people are going to have in five or ten seasons, not just a couple of year, we're continuing the Gason motto of 'Built to Last'," Mr McCluskey said.

He said it was a clean, simplistic machine designed to have as few weak points as possible, all anchored by a strong frame.

In terms of the tines, Mr McCluskey said the T12000 had continued with Gason's tried and tested ScariTill or HydraTill set-ups.

"The tines are well regarded by farmers, they are really tough and durable and good for Australian cropping conditions.

The planter is 12 metres, but Mr McCluskey said a key feature was the planters ability to fold to a transport width of 6.5m, making it road travel compliant, through the use of two hydraulic wings on either side of the main frame.

"Compliance with National Heavy Vehicle legislation is really important these days and this machine is fine to move under these laws."

In terms of its operational set-up he said there had been a few improvements to the previous model.

"We set out to build a machine that is simple and robust in design but with new features added that give reliability for the broadacre operator," he said.

"There has been technology advances in areas such as laser cutting since we put out last model out and we have taken advantage of that with the new model."

He said he was confident the renowned Gason toughness would still be in play following a thorough testing process.

"We subjected the design to extensive computer stress analysis before we built the prototype machine that iwe demonstrated at the Wimmera field days."

There has already been good interest in the machine.

"The first unit has been purchased off our computer drawings by our Gason dealer Hicks Machinery on behalf of their client a local district grain grower from north of Horsham."

Mr McCluskey said design features on the T12000 included a single row of 500/55-22.5 high floatation tubeless tyres and a rigid pull design which makes for a strong and manoeuvrable machine.

NEW DESIGN: AF Gason design engineer Tom McCluskey with the new Gason T12000 planter bar in a twelve metre width.

NEW DESIGN: AF Gason design engineer Tom McCluskey with the new Gason T12000 planter bar in a twelve metre width.

"The wheel spacings are three metres apart to accommodate controlled farming applications," he said.

"The T12000 has five toolbar rows with a nominal spacing of one metre.

Mr McCluskey said the hydraulic tines allow the operator to back-off the breakout force if there are rocks in the paddock while still getting the job done, and a range of parallelogram or frame mounted press wheels can also be added to the machine.

He said a T10000 version would also be made available, featuring the same design in a 10m working width.

The story Prototype planter on display first appeared on Farm Online.

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