Panic buying impacts outback stations

Video: Outback communities impacted by panic buying in the city

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Decisions made by Sydney shoppers affect outback farmers.

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CWA past-president Annette Turner on panic buying. Source - CWA of NSW

Coronavirus-induced panic buying is impacting even the state's remote outback communities.

Country Women's Association of NSW immediate past present, Annette Turner is from a sheep station at White Cliffs, 300km north of Broken Hill.

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Speaking to CWA of NSW CEO Danica Leys in the above video, Mrs Turner said she recently did a six hour round trip to go to the shops and was greeted with empty shelves and restrictions on how much she could purchase.

Empty shelves where toilet paper would usually be stacked.

Empty shelves where toilet paper would usually be stacked.

"We have four children in the house at the moment and we worry about where we're going to get the food to feed them if this panic buying keeps on going," Mrs Turner said.

"We can travel for six hours to get two loaves of bread and a two litres of milk."

Immediate past president of CWA of NSW, Annette Turner.

Immediate past president of CWA of NSW, Annette Turner.

She explained that their local supermarkets were struggling to source enough supplies.

"If everyone just bought what they needed, it would all be ok," Mrs Turner said.

"Please stop doing it, there's enough to go around."

Ms Leys said she hoped people would think about how the choices they make in a Sydney supermarket could have knock-on effects, even impacting farmers in White Cliffs

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