Processors join the fight

Heavy cattle made up to 388c/kg as processors fought to fill orders

Beef
Aa

Heavy heifers sold up 25 cents dearer at Wagga.

Aa
This pen of Mandalong Special cows from Walcha made 309c/kg at the Tamworth prime sale on Monday. Photo by Tamworth Livestock Selling Agents Association.

This pen of Mandalong Special cows from Walcha made 309c/kg at the Tamworth prime sale on Monday. Photo by Tamworth Livestock Selling Agents Association.

For weeks, prime cattle sales across the state have been driven by restockers chasing lighter cattle, and while that might still be the case, heavier articles are starting to attract higher prices.

Wagga Wagga Elders WMLP agent Joe Wilks said at the heavy-end, 500-plus kilograms, both steers and heifers were dearer.

"Major processors were really trying to get sufficient numbers," Mr Wilks said.

"The job started off 10 or 15 cents dearer, but ended up being 20 to 25 cents dearer by the end of the day for heavier weight cattle."

He said cattle weighing 500-plus kilograms made up to 385c/kg to 388c/kg, while the roughly 600 cows on offer were also sought after, the best selling for up to 320c/kg.

"Supply was similar to last week and the majority of the market is still made up of restocker, feeder cattle," Mr Wilks said.

Tamworth Nutrien livestock agent, Scott Simshauser, said there was an increased number of prime cows coming off high performance pastures at the Tamworth saleyards this week.

"Vendors were rewarded for the high yielding cows, with prices between 280c/kg to 310c/kg."

"At the same time the plainer cows, are not very far behind in price.

"The well-finished cows are going to processors, as are your medium-weight cows and there are some light cows, better bred, which are going to restockers."

Mr Simshauser said heavy heifers sold particularly well at Monday's prime sale.

"There were several quality runs around 500kg that were averaging 355c/kg, it's definitely dearer than recent weeks," he said.

MLA's National Livestock Reporting Service said grown steers were slightly cheaper than last week, selling for up to 398c/kg compared to 401c/kg.

Mr Simshauser said while the numbers of finished cattle remained low, prices would continue to be strong.

"I think it's a year to watch your cattle not the news, get them finished and ready to go," he said.

The National Livestock Reporting Service said Carcoar saw a good supply of cows and grown heifers, but grown steers were limited.

Prime grown steers and heifers were six cents dearer with the steers selling from 302c/kg to 350c/kg, while the prime grown heifers sold from 327c/kg to 350c/kg.

Feeder steers and heifers were up by around 10 cents, steers selling from 365c/kg to 420c/kg, while the feeder heifers sold from 366c/kg to 396c/kg.

Clements and McCarthy, Bathurst, livestock agent James Hagney said feeder orders they hadn't seen for three to four weeks were back this week.

"Going into winter the feeder supply will probably drop," Mr Hagney said.

"I would have thought we'll be light for numbers from now on at Carcoar."

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by