More signs of rain on the horizon for NSW

More signs of rain on the horizon for NSW | Weather In Focus

Weather
With the rainfall in the past week, large areas of central and eastern NSW have now experienced a wetter-than-average July.

With the rainfall in the past week, large areas of central and eastern NSW have now experienced a wetter-than-average July.

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There are early signs that another upper-level trough will cross south-eastern Australia at some point next week.

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Parts of NSW have recorded some decent rain during the past week and more wet weather could be on the cards next week as well.

The passage of an upper-level trough - or a pool of cold air aloft - caused rain and thunderstorms in NSW from late last week into the beginning of this week.

The heaviest falls from this dynamic system occurred east of the ranges, where multi-day accumulations exceeded 300 millimetres in some coastal areas.

This rain caused both flash and riverine flooding. West of the divide, some places in central western NSW picked up 40mm to 80mm from this system.

With this latest rainfall, large areas of central and eastern NSW have now experienced a wetter-than-average July.

For some places in the state's east, this has been their wettest July on record.

Looking ahead, there are early signs that another upper-level trough will cross south-eastern Australia at some point next week.

There is still quite a bit of uncertainty around the strength and timing of this system, although it should bring rain to NSW at some stage next week.

Exactly when and how much rain will fall is too difficult to predict just yet.

There are also promising signs of more useful rain as we head beyond winter into spring.

The Pacific Ocean is currently in a La Nina-like pattern and long-range forecast models suggest that this should continue in the months ahead.

The Bureau of Meteorology say there is currently a 50 per cent chance that a La Nina event will develop during the second half of 2020. La Nina typically causes above average rain over much of northern and eastern Australia in winter and spring.

This year is shaping up to be more bountiful than last year in terms of rainfall in NSW.

During 2019, the state only recorded above average rainfall during one month (March).

In 2020, there have already been three wetter-than-average months during the first half of the year and this trend could continue into the second half of the year as well.

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