Surf and turf takes on a different meaning

Breaking the coast mould with Santa Gertrudis stud

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PLANNING: While most of his mates were surfing, Hugh Shannon from Belmore Santa Gertrudis, Crescent Head, was saving for his first stud females. Photo: Samantha Townsend

PLANNING: While most of his mates were surfing, Hugh Shannon from Belmore Santa Gertrudis, Crescent Head, was saving for his first stud females. Photo: Samantha Townsend

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Crescent Head is home to Belmore Santa Gertrudis - a stud run by 20-year-old Hugh Shannon - just 500 metres from the beach 'as the crow flies'.

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It's home to one of the longest right-hand point breaks in NSW - but it has another little known claim to fame under its belt.

Crescent Head is home to Belmore Santa Gertrudis - a stud run by 20-year-old Hugh Shannon - just 500 metres from the beach 'as the crow flies'.

While most of his mates were surfing, Hugh was saving for his first stud cows, which he purchased in 2016 from Cooper Park Santas Gertrudis at Clybucca.

He bought three and registered his stud the same year.

Those females were then shown locally at Wauchope, Kempsey, Macksville and Dorrigo where they took home a number of titles including champion junior Santa female and champion Bos Indicus.

"I was always interested in cattle and wanted to do something different to everyone else around here and didn't see any money in surfing," Hugh said.

"There is no one my age breeding Bos Indicus here on the coast, which do really well on this sandy country.

"But due to our small land holding, we have limited carrying capacity so our focus is on quality not quantity at this stage."

The persistence in sourcing the right genetics for the coast paid off recently when he sold his first bull Belmore Punchline (sire Dangarfield Universe) at Nioa Big S Santa Gertrudis Sale at Allora in Queensland for $6000.

His father Matthew said he was proud of his son who had received great comments from well-known Santa Gertrudis breeders at the sale.

"I sure am proud of him, he did a lot of work to find the right genetics and to have people who have been breeding Santas for a long time say it was a cracking calf is a great accolade" Matthew said.

Meanwhile back on the farm, Hugh is feeding his next crop of weaner bulls a grain mix from Drury's Stockfeeds.

While his stud is only young with just 15 head, his plans are to eventually hold on farm bull sales.

"The coast is not known for bull sales but has so much potential," he said.

Hugh said it was vital more young people got into agricultural operations in the Macleay Valley as it had a diverse farming landscape.

"I want to show people that the Macleay, is a great place for breeding good quality cattle," he said.

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