Aussies care more about food after COVID

Aussies care more about food after COVID-19

Smart Farmer News
AWARENESS: COVID-19 has made Australians more conscious of where their food comes from, according to National Farmers Federation research. Photo: Shutterstock.

AWARENESS: COVID-19 has made Australians more conscious of where their food comes from, according to National Farmers Federation research. Photo: Shutterstock.

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Almost one quarter of Australians say COVID-19 has made them more conscious of where their food comes from, according to new research by the National Farmers' Federation, released on National Agriculture Day.

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Almost one quarter of Australians say COVID-19 has made them more conscious of where their food comes from, according to new research by the National Farmers' Federation, released on National Agriculture Day.

NFF president and Liverpool Plains farmer, Fiona Simson said panic buying and temporary supermarket shortages had caused angst for many Australians.

"It is logical that Australians have taken a greater interest in the origin of their meat, dairy, eggs, bread, fruit, vegetables and more," she said.

"Inquiring consumers should be pleasantly surprised to find that up to 96 per cent of the food in their supermarket is home grown.

"All Australians should take comfort in the fact that we are one of the most food secure nations in the world.

"Every year we produce up to two thirds more food than we can consume at home."

Increased interest was greatest in elder Australians, with one in three over 55 reporting to now think more about food origins.

Females were also likely to be more conscious of the source of their groceries, at 31%, compared to men 24%.

Ms Simson said National Agriculture Day was all about celebrating the plentiful, quality, safe and sustainable food and natural fibres grown right here and the farmers behind it.

"Importantly, AgDay is also an opportunity for farmers to have an ongoing conversation with consumers about how and where our food comes from," she said.

"Supply chain disruptions and a return to home cooking brought Australians back to basics and in effect, closer to farmers."

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