Wheat breeder wins GRDC Excellence award

CSIRO wheat breeder Greg Rebetzke wins GRDC Excellence award

Cropping
GRDC Northern Panel chair John Minogue (right) presenting CSIRO chief research scientist Greg Rebeztke with the 2021 Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Recognising and Rewarding Excellence Award. Photo: GRDC

GRDC Northern Panel chair John Minogue (right) presenting CSIRO chief research scientist Greg Rebeztke with the 2021 Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Recognising and Rewarding Excellence Award. Photo: GRDC

Aa

CSIRO researcher recognised in GRDC award.

Aa

CSIRO Agriculture and Food chief research scientist Greg Rebetzke was awarded the 2021 Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Recognising and Rewarding Excellence Award on Tuesday.

GRDC Northern Region Panel Chair John Minogue said Dr Rebetzke, a leading wheat researcher, was awarded for his commitment to industry and his dedication to delivering genetic traits to commercial wheat breeders that result in meaningful improvements for grain growers.

"He is a skilled scientist, but what sets Greg apart is his ability to explain his area of specialty - complex genetics, pre-breeding and physiological understanding - in a straightforward, meaningful way that is understood and appreciated by those working in the paddock," Mr Minogue said.

"He is extremely well versed in the language of growers and that makes an incredible difference. Greg is also unashamedly passionate about the grains industry and determined to use his scientific knowledge and research skills to make a positive impact."

Originally from Brisbane, Dr Rebetzke completed his undergraduate degree at Gatton Agricultural College, before doing a Masters in Agricultural Science at the University of Queensland and a PhD in breeding and genetics at North Carolina State University.

Dr Rebetzke has worked with CSIRO since 1995 and became a Chief Research Scientist in 2017.

"Growing up, my family ran cattle on a property near Rathdowney, just south-west of Brisbane, and I relished the time I spent in there. It really was the start of my interest in agriculture," Dr Rebetzke said.

"Then working with growers along the western most edge of the NSW wheatbelt, early in my career, really confirmed where I wanted to focus my energy.

"I wanted to use science to make a difference, to overcome some of the challenges that growers were dealing with trying to grow crops and remain profitable in some pretty harsh Australian environments."

Have you signed up to The Land's free daily newsletter? Register below to make sure you are up to date with everything that's important to NSW agriculture.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by