Reducing usage of carbon-based energy at Cargo

Reducing usage of carbon-based energy at Cargo

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COOL BUNCH: See Saw Wines co-owner Justin Jarrett's new prosecco has won both a silver and a bronze medal in wine shows. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

COOL BUNCH: See Saw Wines co-owner Justin Jarrett's new prosecco has won both a silver and a bronze medal in wine shows. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

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Climate change is a real and present danger for Justin and Pip Jarret

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Climate change is a real and present danger for Justin and Pip Jarret at their high country vineyard See Saw Wine, Cargo.

The 170 hectare vineyard was established in 1995 and Mr Jarret noted with a one degree increase in day temperatures, harvest of their premium grapes is now some four to five weeks earlier than in past years.

"The wine industry is at the luxurious end of agricultural production and as a family we believe it is a privilege to be able to produce wine," he said.

"But we must also be conscious of our business operation's impact on the landscape and therefore we see it as our responsibility to reduce that impact through reduced use of carbon-based fuels and grid electricity."

Mr Jarret said it is the intention of he and Pip to ensure the vineyard is in a condition to better weather future climatic disruptions.

"That is our ethos," he said.

"If we are not putting our hands up, how can we make comment about others who might not be doing their bit."

Mr Jarret said it is important for his family to make efforts now to reduce the carbon emission from the vineyard and also to reduce their future reliance on grid electricity and diesel fuels.

To that end, he noted future investment in electric vehicles which will be powered from solar-panels on the farm.

"We already have installed 30kw of solar cells around the farm to draw water from the bores and we are installing solar panels on the winery," he said.

"Further, we are planning to replace our current vehicles and motor bikes with electric powered ones once they become more readily available."

Mr Jarret noted there are 566km roads on the vineyard and they are ready-made for alternative powered vehicles.

"We want to generate as much electricity on-farm as we possibly can," he said.

"And we are also looking at hydrogen as an alternative source of fuel to power our tractors and trucks."

"We aim at zero input of all carbon-based fuels."

Mr Jarret is a keynote speaker at the forthcoming National Renewables in Agriculture conference to be held in Dubbo on 19 May.

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