Thermal spotter reveals mice reality

"Hot little critters" light up on thermal technology

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Yorke Peninsula agronomist and hunter Troy Johnson has repurposed his thermal spotter to reveal the extent of a clients mouse infestation.

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Yorke Peninsula agronomist and hunter Troy Johnson has repurposed his thermal spotter to reveal the extent of a client's mouse infestation.

After an unsuccessful mice survey with headlights in a canola stubble crop Mr Johnson pulled out his Pulsar Krypton thermal hunting equipment to spot several of the vermin still wondering the paddock.

The crop had been been baited 5 days prior with 1kg Bait, before Mr Johnson purchased the technology. Mr Johnson said the amount of heat mice carry means thermal imaging is the perfect way to get a real sense of mouse numbers.

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"I was driving around, surveying the traditional way, using my headlights to see any mice and the thermal has confirmed that is a complete waste of time," he said.

"There are so many more mice than what you see with the headlights of a tractor or a vehicle."

Thermal imaging equipment can cost anywhere from $1,000 to $10,000. Mr Johnson said the technology is going to be his go-to tool for future baiting.

"They're expensive little toys but what I've seen in the last couple of weeks shows its a game changer when monitoring mice," he said.

"They're such hot little critters they light up really well."

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The story Thermal spotter reveals mice reality first appeared on Queensland Country Life.

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