Kicking off spring with a cold front and rain

Kicking off spring with a cold front and rain | Weather In Focus

Weather
Daffodils signal the end of winter and warmer days as we head into spring. The wet outlook is being underpinned by a negative Indian Ocean Dipole, which is expected to last until the end of spring. Photo: Karen Bailey

Daffodils signal the end of winter and warmer days as we head into spring. The wet outlook is being underpinned by a negative Indian Ocean Dipole, which is expected to last until the end of spring. Photo: Karen Bailey

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The wet start to spring could be a preview of what's to come later in the season.

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A BAND of rain will spread over NSW towards the end of this week, dampening soil in almost every part of the state.

A cold front crossing the south east will cause a rain band to enter NSW from the south west on Friday.

This rain band will gradually move towards the north east over the next three days, delivering some welcome rain to parts of every district in NSW between Friday and Sunday.

Computer models have been jumping around a bit with this system during the past few days, which has made it difficult to predict where and how much rain will fall across NSW.

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At this stage, widespread accumulated rainfall totals of five millimetres to 15mm are expected and some areas of the state's southern and central inland NSW could record 20mm or more.

There will also be areas that only see little or no rain, although most of the state should pick up something. While this system won't deliver an excessive amount of rain, some catchments are still saturated from winter rains. Make sure you check the flood warnings in your area this weekend.

The wet start to spring could be a preview of what's to come later in the season, according to the latest seasonal outlook issued by the Bureau of Meteorology.

Long-range forecast models indicate that all of NSW has at least a 70 per cent change of exceeding its average rainfall this season.

Areas west of the divide have more than an 80 per cent chance if a wetter-than-usual spring.

This wet spring outlook is being underpinned by a negative Indian Ocean Dipole, which is expected to last until the end of spring, and a La Nina-like pattern in the Pacific Ocean.

Both of these divers enhance rainfall over NSW during spring.

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