Initiative to help burnt waterways recover

Initiative to help burnt waterways recover

Smart Farmer News
RECOVERY: Replanting is just one aspect of helping a bushfire affected area to bounce back.

RECOVERY: Replanting is just one aspect of helping a bushfire affected area to bounce back.

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A state-wide citizen science program has been launched in a bid to monitor the recovery of waterways a year since the 2019-2020 Black Summer bushfires.

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A state-wide citizen science program has been launched in a bid to monitor the recovery of waterways a year since the 2019-2020 Black Summer bushfires.

Aptly named Waterway Fire Science, the project sees OzFish in partnership with Landcare, aiming to mobilise community groups and recreational fishers to self-monitor the recovery of their local waterways.

Volunteers will use a range of water sampling techniques that will contribute to ongoing research efforts and future bushfire recovery programs.

OzFish's project officer for NSW South Coast, Lucas Kas is enthusiastic about the immediate impact citizen scientists can have.

"The more people we can get to roll up their sleeves and get out in the field to collect data, the clearer the picture we will have of the rate of recovery," he said.

"Understanding the way these systems are recovering is key to minimising the impact fires have in the future.

Bushfires are inevitable in Australia, but residents can now get involved in how to help habitat revive."

The program is calling upon community members interested in making a contribution to their local waterways, to get involved.

OzFish will provide training on identifying the impacts fire has on riparian vegetation, water quality and riverbank stability, as well as how to measure, monitor, respond to, and commence the recovery.

Landcare NSW chair, Stephanie Cameron said local Landcare groups, recreational fishers and individuals can increase their skills to make a real difference.

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