Emissions tech to fuel farmers imaginations

Innovative emissions tech to be showcased in Ayr

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Bio-Agtive Emissions Technology inventor, fourth generation Canadian farmer and motor mechanic Gary Lewis.

Bio-Agtive Emissions Technology inventor, fourth generation Canadian farmer and motor mechanic Gary Lewis.

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An information session will be held in Ayr on Monday, August 22, where Bio Agtive Emissions Technology (BAET) inventor, fourth generation Canadian farmer and motor mechanic Gary Lewis will detail the potential of BAET.

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Is there merit in injecting exhaust gases into the soil? Could this technology be applied to the sugarcane industry?

Forward-thinking farmers are being invited to ask questions and be the judge in an innovative information session being held in Ayr on Monday, August 22, where Bio Agtive Emissions Technology (BAET) inventor, fourth generation Canadian farmer and motor mechanic Gary Lewis will detail the potential of BAET.

For the past 32 years, Mr Lewis along with wife Barb and their five children, have owned and managed their Olin Creek Ranch which is located just south of Calgary in Alberta. 

In 2002, Gary’s quest to becoming energy self-sufficient on his own farm led him to begin recycling the irrigation motor emissions into plant nutrients.

He studied and applied the pure science of plant physiology to understand the plants amazing ability to switch energy sources from fossil fuel based fertilisers to bioactivity in the soil.  

This was stimulated by emissions and sunlight and there has been more recent plant science discovery of nano/carbon which has supported the continued advancement and quest of BAET.

A 15 tyne ripper fitted with Bio-Agtive Emissions Technology.

A 15 tyne ripper fitted with Bio-Agtive Emissions Technology.

“Exhaust gas places active soluble nitrogen into the soil, but – more importantly – also carbon and nitrogen at a ratio of 30:1, which is perfect for the development of nitrogen-fixing, free-living bacteria,” Mr Lewis said.

“I have applied the process to my farm and, after 10 years of collaboration with farmers from around the world, we’ve made advancements in the technology that can be adapted to suit a variety of crops,” he said.

This event is part of the NQ Dry Tropics’ Sugarcane Innovations Program, which promotes inventive thinking and supports farmers to evaluate and implement blue-sky methods of addressing reduction in nutrient and pesticide applications.

NQ Dry Tropics project officer Anthony Curro said BAET is as blue-sky as it gets, by farming using recycled tractor exhaust fumes injected back into the soil. 

“This is definitely not something that has ever been seen on a tractor in the sugarcane industry,” Mr Curro said.

Forward thinking farmers are encouraged to register now for the event being held at the Kalamia Hotel in Ayr which will include dinner on the night for registered guests.

To register phone 0408 272 613 or anthony.curro@nqdrytropics.com.au.

The story Emissions tech to fuel farmers imaginations first appeared on North Queensland Register.

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