Trangie herd heads to Dubbo

Trangie herd heads to Dubbo


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Mullah Station Shorthorn bullocks being sold at the first liveweight sale at Trangie saleyards on May 1, 1973. Left Edward Purseglove, Malcolm Kater, Allan McCutcheon.

Mullah Station Shorthorn bullocks being sold at the first liveweight sale at Trangie saleyards on May 1, 1973. Left Edward Purseglove, Malcolm Kater, Allan McCutcheon.

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Trangie's Mullah Shorthorns now in third generation management and going strong.

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SHORTHORN cattle are still breeding and finishing in the paddocks of “Mullah” and other McCutcheon family properties in the Trangie district.

But now they are managed by the family’s third generation.

At the time when brothers Allan and Sid McCutcheon purchased “Mullah” from the Beveridge family in 1965 a quality mob of 60 Beef Shorthorn cows came with the property and those big frame matrons were the foundations of the herd remaining on “Mullah” today as well as other family members’ properties in the district.

Amanda, Simon and Rob McCutcheon with some of their Mullah Station bred Shorthorns when selling at a store cattle sale at Dubbo saleyards several years ago.

Amanda, Simon and Rob McCutcheon with some of their Mullah Station bred Shorthorns when selling at a store cattle sale at Dubbo saleyards several years ago.

The late Allan McCutcheon was a keen supporter of the Dubbo National Shorthorn Show and Sale since its inception and is followed by his son, Rob and his sons, Simon, Jason, Joe, Charlie, Ned and Bert as succession plans pass ownership along.

A grandson, Jason McCutcheon said prior to these fixtures the family used to buy replacement sires at Sydney Royal Show or direct from studs in the area.

“My grandfather not only purchased some good stock from Dubbo, but built some lifelong friendships there as well,” he said.

“Now after three lots of succession planning and 40 or so years, the herd at “Mullah” is still supported by bulls purchased at Dubbo annually and further friendships built.”

Apart from the advantages the breed has to offer the McCutcheons believe the the Dubbo sale is an easy venue to buy their bulls and get value for money.

“You will always find a large number of quality bulls whichever way your breeding is headed and your budget,” Mr McCutcheon said.

“If you miss the bull of your first choice on the auction floor there will always be a bull next in line that will meet your requirements and fill your order.”

Mullah Shorthorns graze principally on native pastures then grazing oats and lucerne, are yard-weaned and occasionally supplementary fed oats and lucerne to reach feedlot acceptable weights.

Marrington bloodlines have often featured in the program however, bloodlines from around Australia have been used for diversification.

“Over the years we have managed changes from a bullock focus to weaner focus and everything in between with this breed, and achieved good results,” Mr McCutcheon said.

“It is undoubtedly a feature of the Shorthorn breed here in our patch of Trangie.

“Certainly what the stock have to graze on contributes to their ‘do ability’, but the changes brought to Shorthorn bloodlines by breeders over a long period have added that bit extra.”

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