Potential show champions

Potential show champions at Glen Innes steer sale


Beef
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Future show champions will be on offer in the 10th annual Glen Innes Potential Show Steer Sale on Monday, February 25.

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POTENTIAL FOR THE SHOW RING: One of the steers to be offered by Smithston farms at this year's Glen Innes Potential Show Steer Sale.

POTENTIAL FOR THE SHOW RING: One of the steers to be offered by Smithston farms at this year's Glen Innes Potential Show Steer Sale.

FUTURE show champions will be on offer in the 10th annual Glen Innes Potential Show Steer Sale on Monday, February 25.

This year’s sale includes 30 steers from five to 10 months of age, all with the potential to succeed at regional or royal shows.

There are also two opportunities for $1000 jackpots, for the highest scoring steer shown at the EKKA and the Glen Innes Led Steer Extravaganza.

Colin Say & Co agent Shad Bailey said the sale, to be livestreamed by Elite Livestock Auctions, was a great opportunity for regional producers to achieve premiums with their best calves.

“The quality of the cattle just keeps improving each year, and northern schools have really supported the concept."

All cattle will be judged by Jon Gaffney, Graneta Limousin and Angus stud, Bell, Queensland, prior to the sale.

Inspection begins at 8.30am, for a 10am sale start.

Show steer success for longtime vendor

Dugald and Bec McIndoe and Bill and Irene McIndoe, Smithston Farms, have been part of the sale since it began a decade ago.

The McIndoes run 450 to 500 breeders, selling the progeny as weaners, usually through the Inverell weaner sales and privately to Alexander Downs, Merriwa.

The Smithston Farms steers are sourced from the crossbred commercial herd, with Charolais bulls used over Angus, black baldy and Hereford breeders.

“We’re not trying to breed show steers, but just good commercial cattle, and each year a few of the calves are a bit exceptional,” Mr McIndoe said.

The steers have performed on the hoof and hook, with the Colin Say & Co incentive jackpot winning steer at EKKA last year, exhibited by Travis Luscombe. That steer was also a member of the Charolais team that won the Ken McDonald shield.

Another Smithston Farms steer, shown by McIntyre High School, went on to win the second $1000 jackpot at the Led Steer Extravanganza in September.

The steers are proven performers, but there’s no special treatment on farm, with the calves usually taken off their mothers just prior to the sale.

“Usually when we’re pulling the bulls out from the cows, we can see the potential in some of them, but they’re not chosen for the sale until they’re six months old,” Mr McIndoe said.

“The hybrid vigour from crossbreeding undoubtedly helps with the growth of the calves. 

“A British-bred cow has the softness and doability, and they’re put to a Charolais bull to get that bit extra muscle expression in the calves.”

JACKPOT WINNER: A Smithston Farms steer purchased by Nigel and Casey Wieck, Delungra, in 2017.

JACKPOT WINNER: A Smithston Farms steer purchased by Nigel and Casey Wieck, Delungra, in 2017.

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