Tongala meeting to demand scrapping of Basin Plan

There is a growing rage in the Southern Basin about the MDBP


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In this file photo from Deniliquin in 2011 one farmer's thoughts are made clear. A meeting in Tongala tomorrow morning will lay out plans for a national campaign against the Murray Darling Basin Plan.

In this file photo from Deniliquin in 2011 one farmer's thoughts are made clear. A meeting in Tongala tomorrow morning will lay out plans for a national campaign against the Murray Darling Basin Plan.

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The little northern Victorian town of Tongala will today host what promises to be the beginning of a national campaign to scrap the Murray Darling Basin Plan and the 2007 Water Act.

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A MEETING in Tongala's town hall, in northern Victoria, will today (Wednesday) demand the Murray Darling Basin Plan be scrapped and the 2007 Water Act repealed.

The Southern Basin Communities, headed by Wade Northausen, have called the meeting and will discuss tactics of pushing the demands to a national level.

"This is not about state versus state, this is not about farmer versus environmentalist, they (governments and the MDBA) have used divide and conquer tactics very well so far, we won't be a part of that, this is about Australia," said Mr Northausen.

He said it was time a federal Royal Commission specifically investigated the corrupt intentions of politicians and bureaucrats at the time the Basin Plan was created.

"The Murray Darling Basin Plan has nothing to do with positive environmental outcomes, most of the things it touches it kills.

"We believe the Plan is a bid to kill off family farms and communities and Australia's food security."

Mr Northausen said once that scenario was achieved, then the doors would be opened to corporations to take control of Australia's land and water and "they can't do that while family farms exist and are happy, and the children are content to return to the farm and make a living".

He said people would be making their way from NSW and Swan Hill to Wednesday's meeting.

The gathering is a sign of a growing militancy in the southern basin, which remains on zero irrigation allocations.

"We've had plenty of rain," said Mr Northausen, "it's all stored in the irrigation dams and the government is running it all into the Southern Ocean.

"What we are seeing at the moment - as a direct result of the Basin Plan - is the biggest transfer of wealth we have ever seen in Australia's history."

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