Hawkesbury's Joan Pracey takes the reins

Hawkesbury's Joan Pracey takes the reins

Horses
Joan Pracey (centre) the new president of the Australian Thoroughbred Breeders Club, with board members Barbara Robertson and former president Di Lanham at the recent ATBC's annual awards meeting. Photo Virginia Harvey.

Joan Pracey (centre) the new president of the Australian Thoroughbred Breeders Club, with board members Barbara Robertson and former president Di Lanham at the recent ATBC's annual awards meeting. Photo Virginia Harvey.

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Thoroughbred breeders awarded for success on the track.

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Hawkesbury conditioner Joan Pracey was awarded the top job as president of the Australian Thoroughbred Breeders Club (ATBC) at its recent annual awards evening and general meeting.

Headquartered on the Hawkesbury racecourse at Clarendon, the ATBC was formerly headed by Di Lanham, a founding member who is stepping down from duties.

Joan said it was an honour to follow-on from Di Lanham's leadership.

"I want Di to continue being my mentor, with all her years' experience of running the ATBC and being one of the stronger female members of the Thoroughbred industry," Joan said after her voluntary appointment.

"She (Di) has bred and raced horses successfully for many years."

Similarly, Joan has been highly successful breeding, owning, as well as training horses for more than three decades.

Also employed via TAFE and involved with the Australian Racing and Equine Academy, Joan gained a committee position on the ATBC board three years ago.

Carol Bailey (centre) of Hazelbrook was recognised at the awards evening with ATBC board members Janita Marscham and Paul Humphrey. Photo Virginia Harvey.

Carol Bailey (centre) of Hazelbrook was recognised at the awards evening with ATBC board members Janita Marscham and Paul Humphrey. Photo Virginia Harvey.

"I have thoroughly enjoyed being part of the committee and seeing the benefits of the club and what they can give back to their members," she said.

"The club's breeders' stallion tender scheme is a great benefit, as it allows small breeders a chance to breed and own a horse that they can race with the opportunity for them to stay in the industry, and it's not just having the money to go to the big studs."

"They (ATBC) are representing the smaller trainers as well; trainers can also breed a nice horse at smaller costs if they cannot afford to buy a horse at the sales."

The ATBC breeding honours were also recognised for the 2018/19 season; Blue Mountains breeder Carol Bailey taking Category A - which pertained to an owner of four or more mares, while Peter Killen Category B - for owning one to three mares.

Breeding from one broodmare, Firefly Magic, at his Krambach property 'Yowie Yards' (on the Mid-North Coast), Peter - together with his partner Sue Oldfield, bred and raced (in partnership) two successful gallopers last season.

Firefly Magic has produced four-year-old mare Malea Magic (by Arlington) who won five races last season, while her older sister also won a race last season. Both are back racing, along with the hopes of their juvenile gelded half-brother Magic Mula (Mulaazem) who is yet to race.

Dual winner Tikkitala (Tickets), and others Classy Anna (Pluck), Shrapelli (Shrapnel), Wee Rascal (Ready As), and Indiana Star (Zoffany) all won races last season and were bred by Carol.

Mid North-Coast breeder Peter Killen with his one broodmare Firefly Magic (and one of her progeny Malea Magic right). Photo Virginia Harvey.

Mid North-Coast breeder Peter Killen with his one broodmare Firefly Magic (and one of her progeny Malea Magic right). Photo Virginia Harvey.

The Jericho Cup

Recent winner of staying test the 'Australian Light Horse Association Road To The Jericho' at Canberra, the Barbara Joseph trained Ten Tigers has secured his place in the final field of the $300,000 Jericho Cup at Warrnambool on Sunday.

It is Australia's longest flat race - run over 4600 metres - and it was initiated as a commemoration of the Australian Light Horseman during the First World War when competing in a race that was run on the desert sands near the city of Jericho in Palestine.

Restricted to horses bred in Australia and New Zealand, entrants have to earn a start in the final via a points system from previous performances over certain distance races in Victoria and southern NSW.

It was a matter of "wait and see", for Ten Tigers and hoop Aaron Sweeney, who trailed seven lengths behind for most of the 3400 metres national capital spectacle, the five-year-old Medaglia d'Oro gelding successfully circled the field to win running away by three lengths.

Catering helps those in need

While NSW has had its share of racing cancellations, postponements and relocations due to drought and horrific bushfires, the Mid North Coast region has been significantly hampered in its efforts to race while grappling with life-threatening events.

Last week the Manning Valley Race Club had to abandon its meeting due to smoke haze, poor air quality and vision on the morning of its nine-race card.

While hugely disappointed, the club's chief executive officer Helen Sinclair was quick to act and had its pre-prepared catering donated to the numerous displaced people who had been sheltering in recent weeks from the fires at the Taree Showground.

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