Winter crops crack on as summer crops sown on Liverpool Plains

Breeza Station winter crops steady as season progresses

News
The wheat at Breeza Station is vibrant and healthy, thanks to regular rain. Photo: James Pursehouse

The wheat at Breeza Station is vibrant and healthy, thanks to regular rain. Photo: James Pursehouse

Aa

The Pursehouses want the rain to keep on coming in what is proving to be a promising season.

Aa

PROMISING rain forecasts are music to the ears of farmers on the Liverpool Plains.

More than 530mm has fallen at Breeza Station this year and farmer James Pursehouse said this was only about 100mm off the property's average annual rainfall pre-drought.

He said they had been spreading urea on the 1200 hectares of durum and bread wheat and were anticipating rain to follow and wash it in.

"You take a punt when the forecast is good," Mr Pursehouse said.

Barley, fava beans and chick peas all received a good dousing of rain right after they were planted a few months ago and the regular falls since has ensured steady growth.

Wheat at Breeza Station.

Wheat at Breeza Station.

The Pursehouses' agronomist Matt Roseby had hoped for 30-50mm in August to set crops up for spring but only (about 25mm) fell.

However, Mr Pursehouse said the crops were "still going really well", though, "it will take a bit more rain" this month to finish them off.

In good news, plenty of rain is predicted.

"The forecast for La Nina has been locked in. That's promising coming into summer as well," Mr Pursehouse said.

Well-developed wheat heads. Photo: James Pursehouse

Well-developed wheat heads. Photo: James Pursehouse

While some farmers in Spring Ridge, Nea, Mullaley and near Curlewis have had issues with mice, Breeza Station hasn't had any little visitors at this stage.

The Pursehouses have their sights firmly focused on summer cropping and corn was going in the ground as ACM spoke to Mr Pursehouse.

This season, they are planting 100 hectares of dryland corn and 200 hectares of irrigated corn

"We're growing some feed variety this year in one paddock and also growing two paddocks of grit varieties," Mr Pursehouse said.

"We'll plant dryland sorghum and cotton as well in early October."

The story Winter crops crack on as summer crops sown on Liverpool Plains first appeared on The Northern Daily Leader.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by