Art interpreting regenerative landscapes| Photos

Art interpreting regenerative landscapes| Photos

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Gill Sanbrook, Bibbaringa, Bowna discussing some of the landscapes featured in the Earth Canvas Travelling Exhibition with curator Kate Eastick, Albury Library Museum.

Gill Sanbrook, Bibbaringa, Bowna discussing some of the landscapes featured in the Earth Canvas Travelling Exhibition with curator Kate Eastick, Albury Library Museum.

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The Earth Canvas Travelling Exhibition to visit regional art galleries during the next two years.

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Linking artists with regenerative farmers and creating a better future is the theme of the Current Earth Canvas Travelling Exhibition on display at the Albury Library Museum until the 7 February.

Curator Kate Eastick said the artwork includes the mediums of paint, collage, wood cuts, prints, photography and installations.

"The exhibition is highlighting each artists view of the particular landscape to which they had been introduced and it leaves an overwhelming impression on the visitors," Ms Eastick said.

"They are beautiful works of art and they highlight the care the farmers have for their land, not just for now but also for the future."

The Earth Canvas project invited seven contemporary artists to work on regenerative farms between the Murray and Murrumbidgee rivers in southern New South Wales.

The project aimed to link the artists' perspective on the land with the farmers' management of the land.

Curating the exhibition has shown Ms Eastick there was a mutual creativity of approach and deep empathy with the landscape by those who live and work the land.

"I am really concerned about the effect of climate change on our future and it's good to see that farms can be beautiful and productive and also minimising the impact of climate change," she said.

"The ambition of this travelling exhibition is to share the vision of those regenerative farmers as seen through the eye of the artist."

In the forward to the exhibition brochure, Sasha Grishin AM FAHA, Emeritus Professor, Australian National University acknowledged the significance of the travelling exhibition and encouraged a wide audience to view the art when it was in their region.

"This Earth Canvas exhibition is a significant and pioneering event that sends an unambiguous message that farming practices need to change, and land managers need to see the landscape from a creative and sustainable, regenerative perspective and not purely in terms of a short-term financial balance sheet," Professor Grishin said.

"By seeing the landscape through the eyes of some of Australia's leading artists, this message sneaks up on the visitor as an unexpected personal revelation."

This exhibition explores the experiences of both the regenerative farmer and the artist, their respective engagement with the land and their vision for a healthier world.

At the Albury Library Museum, visitors are contemplating the artwork of Jenny Bell entitled Lifestyle, 2019 when she visited the Coughlan family, Mt Narra Narra, Holbrook. Photo: Earth Canvas

At the Albury Library Museum, visitors are contemplating the artwork of Jenny Bell entitled Lifestyle, 2019 when she visited the Coughlan family, Mt Narra Narra, Holbrook. Photo: Earth Canvas

Featuring works by Rosalind Atkins, Jenny Bell, Jo Davenport, Janet Laurence, Tony Nott, Idris Murphy and John Wolseley the exhibition is next seen in Swan Hill from 19 March before going to Mt Gambier, SA, Mildura, Victoria, Wagga Wagga, Tamworth and Griffith before terminating at the Australian National Museum, ACT in two years.

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