Limousin Square Meater cross the ideal trade steer

Sydney Royal 2021: Trade steer win to Scots All Saints College

Beef
RAS cattle councillor Alastair Rayner and judge Craig Price, Kilcoy Global Foods, Kilcoy, Qld, sash the champion trade steer exhibited by Scots All Saints College, Bathurst, and handled by Gabby Toby, year 11. Photo: Hannah Powe

RAS cattle councillor Alastair Rayner and judge Craig Price, Kilcoy Global Foods, Kilcoy, Qld, sash the champion trade steer exhibited by Scots All Saints College, Bathurst, and handled by Gabby Toby, year 11. Photo: Hannah Powe

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Scots All Saints College, Bathurst, continues its steer success at Sydney Royal, winning champion trade steer today.

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A Limousin Square Meater cross steer described as the "perfect package" has won the Sydney Royal Show trade steer section today.

Exhibited by Scots All Saints College, Bathurst, the champion weighed 550 kilograms with measurements of 13 millimetres and 8mm for rump and rib fats.

Squareness from the front to the back distinguished the top steer from the rest of the field, with judge Craig Price of Kilcoy Global Foods, Kilcoy, Qld impressed by the individual as soon as he entered the ring.

"He is a real standout," Mr Price said.

"The thickness, softness and muscle of this steer is impressive... He is square from the front to the back.

"He is going to yield well, and should have the ideal fat cover for the amount of muscle he carries."

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It was a credible feat for the Bathurst based school that also won grand champion purebred steer yesterday.

Sired by a Square Meater bull and out of Limousin cow, the two tooth steer was originally meant for Upper Hunter Beef Bonanza, Scone, but was held over and trickle fed for this event.

He was also shown by SASC at the Blayney Show last month where he won champion steer amid a strong field of both purebred and crossbred steers.

The power and meat of the steer, while still retaining softness, made him a full package for the school.

SASC director of agricultural studies Libby Dawessaid his brother, sired by the same Square Meater bull, won the Five Star Creative Promotions Online Virtual Show last year.

"I could show you a photo of his brother, and you would think it was him... they are very similar," Mrs Dawes said.

The trade steer champion's father was used over Limousin heifers last year with eight calves on the ground, six of which might make future trade entries.

The reserve champion trade steer from Kempsey High School held by Freya Weismantel, Kempsey, was presented its ribbon by RAS cattle councillor Alastair Rayner and judge Craig Price, Kilcoy Global Foods, Kilcoy, Qld. Photo: Hannah Powe

The reserve champion trade steer from Kempsey High School held by Freya Weismantel, Kempsey, was presented its ribbon by RAS cattle councillor Alastair Rayner and judge Craig Price, Kilcoy Global Foods, Kilcoy, Qld. Photo: Hannah Powe

Kempsey High School received reserve champion trade steer with its 433kg crossbred steer bred by the school's agriculture teacher Gavin Saul and his wife Emily.

Measuring 7mm and 4mm, he was out of a Limousin cow and sired by a Charolais Angus cross bull.

One of two steers shown by Kempsey High at this year's Sydney Royal, it marked the first time the school has entered the trade section.

Aged at around 14 months and on feed for 140 days, Mr Saul said the trade section offering something different and suited the school as there is a lot of trade type of crossbred cattle in the region.

"We like his muscle pattern, he is at the lighter end of the steers in the class but he should have the adequate coverage for the carcase section," he said.

The judge Craig Price was also impressed by the amount of muscle in the reserve steer.

"I felt the amount of muscle in this steer helped get him into reserve," Mr Price said.

"He is not as fat, but should have the right amount for the carcase class."

Receiving 23 inches of rain and experiencing dramatic flooding, the team from Kempsey High had a

"Saturday week we instantly had 85 head less of cattle," Mr Saul said. "We've retrieved about 60 per cent of them so far.

"The steers were at the school, I couldn't get to them so had students go there are check on them.

"It wasn't till Monday that I got back to school and then Tuesday we were on our way here. One steer was left at home."

Like a number of other people in the area post floods Mr Saul said they were busy treating animals for secondary infections and looking after the welfare of the animals, some of which had since calved.

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